Social & Behavioral Sciences | Psychology | Sociology

Note: The rotations below are accurate as of Fall 2020. Unforeseen events could impact the offering of a particular course; however, the department will make every effort to assure the least negative impact on students should a change in a rotation be required. It is highly advisable that students consult with their advisors to most effectively choose courses to complete their degree plans.

Course Rotation: Social & Behavioral Sciences

An introduction to major research methods used in the social sciences (especially history, political science, psychology, and sociology). Students will become familiar with qualitative and quantitative research methods and explore key issues in research design.

Course Offered: Fall and Spring

An inquiry into the origin and development of current social problems with specific reference to social action taken to address these problems. Students will investigate one major problem using the resources from more than one social science discipline.

Course Offered: Fall and Spring

An introductory course that will focus on both descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include measures of central tendency and variability, sampling distributions, the normal distribution, z-scores, correlation, regression, hypotheses testing, t-tests, ANOVA, and chi-square tests. SPSS software will be utilized for all statistical analyses. Prerequisite: Math 1503 or Math 1513.

Course Offered: Fall and Spring

An examination of various qualitative research methods employed in the social sciences. Students will learn to assess the strengths and weaknesses of a variety of methods, and how to utilize one or more methods appropriate to the degree option they have selected. Prerequisite: SBS 3013.

Course Offered: Irregular

An examination of the various quantitative research methods utilized in the social sciences, with an emphasis on the logic of the research, conceptualization of problems, and the application of the methods. This course will specifically focus on experimental design, survey construction and analysis, and application of statistics. Prerequisite: SBS 3013.

Course Offered: Fall and Spring

Students work under the dual supervision of a faculty member and a site supervisor in a government office, museum or historical society, mental health or human welfare agency, law enforcement or judicial organization, or a charitable agency.

Course Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer

Students work under the supervision of a faculty member and a site supervisor in a government office, museum or historical society, mental health or human welfare agency, law enforcement or judicial organization, or a charitable agency.

Course Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer

Students complete an original research project utilizing social scientific methods and knowledge from one or more of the core disciplines in the BSSS program (History, Environmental Studies, Political Science, Psychology, or Sociology). Prerequisite: SBS 3113 or SBS 3213.

Course Offered: Fall and Spring

Course Rotation: Psychology

A survey of basic principles underlying human behavior. Areas covered include scientific methods of inquiry, biological foundations, sensation and perception, consciousness, learning, emotion, motivation, abnormal behavior, and therapy.

Course Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer

The study of normal physiological, intellectual, and emotional aspects of adolescents. Emphasis is on normal development and change as well as psychological and cultural forces affecting them. Issues such as suicide and gangs will be discussed. Prerequisite: PSY 1113.

Course Offered: Irregular

A study of human sexuality from biological, psychological, and social perspectives. An examination of contemporary psychosexual research and theory. Topics are addressed from a science-based perspective and include: history of sex research, gender roles, gender differences in sexual expression, homosexuality, pornography, prostitution, sexual coercion, sexual disorders, and sexual anatomy. Prerequisite: PSY 1113. (Formerly PSY 2933)

Course Offered: Spring Only

Provides a brief overview of the wide spectrum of mental disorders (psychopathology). It examines the definition, classification, etiology, characteristics, and different treatment modalities of several behavioral deficits. Emphasis will be on clinical aspects of each disorder and the application of diagnostic criteria from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). Prerequisite: PSY 1113.

Course Offered: Fall and Spring

Major theories, methods, and research findings that comprise the discipline of social psychology are examined from a critical standpoint including conformity, social influence, social cognition, prosocial behavior, prejudice, group processes, interpersonal attraction, and social comparison. Increases awareness of the social, historical, and political dimension to psychological understanding. Prerequisite: PSY 1113.

Course Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer

A life span course designed to provide an understanding of human behavior and characteristics from conception to death. Information is included on physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development at each period of the life span. Emotional aspects associated with development will be discussed. Prerequisite: PSY 1113. (Formerly PSY 2613)

Course Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer

This course provides an understanding of human behavior and mental processes from conception through adolescence. Includes study for the physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development of the child. Prerequisite: PSY 1113.

Course Offered: Fall and Spring

Survey of the history of the various dogma, theories, technology, and methodological approaches to the behavioral sciences. Prerequisite: PSY 1113.

Course Offered: Spring and Summer

An exploration of the neurobiological foundations of mental health and mental illness, including the study of etiology of mental diseases, developments in genetics, and the evaluation of research findings into applied clinical approaches leading to effective therapies. Prerequisite: PSY 1113.

Course Offered: Irregular

This course is a study of physiological, psychological, sociological, and intellectual aspects of the aging population. The nature and problems of the older adult will be explored. Attitudes toward end of life transitions will be investigated as well as the grieving process and the function of bereavement. Historical perspectives to both aging and end of life will be examined. Prerequisite:  PSY 1113.

Course Offered: Irregular

This course covers theoretical models of learning as well as empirical work from both animal and human models. The focus is on Pavlovian and operant conditioning, but other types of learning are explored including non-associative learning, verbal learning, and observational learning. The course also emphasizes the broad application of basic learning in areas such as behavior modification, child rearing, and drug tolerance. Prerequisite: PSY 1113.

Course Offered: Irregular

A survey of the diverse area of cognitive science. Topics include information processing, attention, memory, visual imagery, problem solving, decision making, and language. The course will emphasize both empirical and theoretical work in the area. Prerequisite: PSY 1113.

Course Offered: Irregular

A comprehensive survey of the theories of personality from classic conceptualizations to contemporary and emerging theoretical perspectives. This course will focus on the primary approaches to understanding personality, personality development and concepts used in defining personality. Prerequisite: PSY 1113.

Course Offered: Spring Only

Major theories, methods, and research findings that comprise the discipline of social psychology are examined from a critical standpoint including conformity, social influence, social cognition, prosocial behavior, prejudice, group processes, interpersonal attraction, and social comparison. Increases awareness of the social, historical, and political dimension to psychological understanding. Prerequisite: PSY 1113or SOC 1113 (Formerly PSY3023).

Course offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer

This course will focus on current topics in psychology not covered in existing course offerings. Intended for the purpose of offering high interest course topics during the semester. It may be repeated with changes of topic. Content varies with instructor. Prerequisite: PSY 1113. (Formerly PSY 2083)

Course Offered: Irregular

This course is designed for undergraduate psychology majors with an interest in clinical psychology. The intent is to provide a survey of the field including the history, scope, methods, concepts, and profession of clinical psychology. Review of the different theoretical perspectives that constitute the discipline. The objective of this course is to provide the student with a broad, solid foundation in clinical psychology in preparation for further training in a mental health profession or psychology graduate program. Prerequisite: PSY 1113.

Course Offered: Irregular

An examination of the biological basis of behavior with emphasis on the structural and functional anatomy of the central nervous system. Prerequisites: PSY 1113 and junior standing.

Course Offered: Irregular

Will explore several issues in the field of sports psychology as they relate to coaches, referees, athletes, and spectators. This course is designed to help students both learn and then apply practical as well as theoretical information as it relates to the psychology of sport. Various mental training skills that can enhance one’s athletic performance will also be covered. Some of the areas related to this class that will be explored include stress, motivation, goal-setting, leadership, and imagery.

Course offered: Fall

Course Rotation: Sociology

Foundations of social interaction including patterns of social structure, culture, socialization, family, education, religion, economic and political structures, primary relationships, social differentiation, organization, deviance, collective behavior, and social change. Scientific methods and sociological theorists will be discussed.

Course Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer

This course will focus on current topics in sociology not covered in existing course offerings. Intended for the purpose of offering high interest course topics during the semester. It may be repeated with changes of topic. Content varies with instructor.

Course Offered: Irregular

A sociological approach to major social problems in contemporary American society. Emphasizes concepts of aging, health care, minorities, poverty, technology, work, and youth. A critical consideration of causes of social maladjustment and consideration for solving societal issues.

Course Offered: Fall, Spring

A social scientific approach to the nature, role, and effects of chemical and psychological addiction in society. Explores a variety of addiction issues as they relate to the social institutions of family, education, politics, and medicine.

Course Offered: Irregular

The study of complex and varied patterns of interaction between people and the environment with special attention to concepts, concerns, and methods of Environmental Studies.

Course Offered: Spring Only (odd years)

Introduction to the field of anthropology, emphasizing human evolution, human genetics, Old World archaeology, and the distribution of various breeding populations around the world. Prerequisite: SOC 1113 or instructor’s permission.

Course Offered: Spring (even years)

The course focuses on patterns in human behavior and on culture as the way people live and adapt to their various situations. Emphasis is on the theory and methodology of cultural anthropology and the diversity of cultural patterns found throughout the world.  Examples from a wide variety of cultures are presented in a variety of formats.

Course Offered: Spring (odd years)

The focus of this course is to examine the juvenile delinquency phenomenon through the historical context of delinquency and the changing legal environment (includes major court decisions that have transformed the juvenile system). Students will explore the theories of the causes of juvenile delinquency and discuss juvenile delinquency prevention and control programs. (Formerly CJ/SOC 2233)

Course Offered: Fall Only (odd years)

A survey of changes in family systems over the years. Area of study includes courtship, love, mate selection, parenthood, and family problems. The course also examines cross-cultural comparisons and considers alternatives to traditional family forms. Emphasis is placed on the use of empirical evidence to evaluate popular beliefs.

Course Offered: Fall Only

An examination of how humans have used the various aspects of the social structure to adapt to the physical environment. Current ecological theories will be utilized to examine social evolution from hunting and gathering to industrial societies. Prerequisite: Nine hours of social science credit.

Course Offered: Fall (odd years)

Critical analysis of criminological theories. The examination of major types of crimes, victims, and criminal behavior. Other topics include definitions, incidents, and trends in criminal behavior and the response of law enforcement, judicial, and correctional systems. (Formerly SOC 2363)

Course Offered: Spring Only

The sociological study of race and ethnicity, including cultural characteristics, social structures, changes, and associated problems. This course will analyze the status of racial, ethnic, and other minority groups within their economic, legal, and social systems.

Course Offered: Spring

The structure, dynamics, and etiology of those behavior systems that are integrated around systemic violations of cultural norms. This course will study the perspectives on non-normative behavior, including the study of mental illness; abuse such as alcohol, drug, physical, and sexual; and alternative sexual lifestyles. Presents and evaluates competing theories of deviance and the social processes by which behaviors are defined as deviant and how those definitions affect the individual.

Course Offered: Fall Only

The study of societies’ relationship with war, in particular: how warfare is viewed by different societies; why societies choose to wage war; how religion, culture, and literature affect society’s perspective of warfare; and the social consequences of waging war for winners and losers. Within the context of American society, this course will address the social impacts of various U.S. wars, and will take some time to explore the rise of the military industrial complex and its effect on American society.

Course Offered: Irregular

This course is focused on the interaction between populations, resources, and the environment in the developed and the developing world.

Course Offered: Spring (even years)

This course explores how food production, distribution, preparation and consumption shape, and are shaped by sociocultural systems. The historical roots of food systems and the relationships among local, national, and global food markets are also presented. The course emphasizes global issues and trends in natural resource utilization (soil, water, and biodiversity), climate change, and the impacts on agriculture, food security, and sustainability.

Offered: Irregular

Theories, methods, and research findings that comprise the discipline of social psychology are examined from a critical standpoint including conformity, social influence, social cognition, prosocial behavior, prejudice, group processes, interpersonal attraction, and social comparison. Increases awareness of the social, historical, and political dimension to psychological understanding. Prerequisite: PSY 1113 or SOC 1113.

Course Offered: Spring, Fall, Summer

The course focuses on the social construction of gender and the influence of gender on experiences in different social contexts. It will also explore how gender intersects and interacts with other social categories such as race, ethnicity, class, age, ability, and sexuality. Lastly, it will examine how gender inequality is built into the structure of social institutions and the individual and social consequences of these inequalities.

Course offered: Spring (even years)

Through an examination of such topics as inequality of opportunity, education, gender, income, wealth, race/ethnicity, and immigration status this course explores different forms of inequality both globally and in the United States.

Course offered: Fall

Examines the social, cultural, economic, and political aspects of games, with a focus on digital gaming in the United States. Topics include the origins and current state of sports and esports, the nature of gender, race, and sexuality in modern gaming, and the way culture, socialization, and values are embedded in gaming.

Course Offered: Spring (even years)

A seminar in selected topics in sociology. Topics and credits may vary each time the course is offered (1-3 credit hours). May be repeated for credit with change in topic. Prerequisite: SOC 1113.

Course Offered: Irregular

A study of the great classical tradition in sociological theory and the expression of this tradition in contemporary theory. The course will include (but not be limited to) Weber, Marx, Durkheim, and Spencer. Prerequisites: Twelve hours of social science credit.

Course Offered: Fall and Spring

The sociological study of class, race, ethnicity, and gender and their relationship to health, illness, and morbidity. The analysis of organization, value systems, and practice of medicine and the provisions of health care in the United States, including the study of etiology of disease, the social meaning and implication of health and illness in everyday life, role of the physician, patients, and the social processes of medical services and professionals.

Course Offered: Spring Only

Social movements are a driving force behind political, social, and cultural change. This course explores the major theoretical approaches used in the social sciences to understand social movements. From this base, the course will examine a range of case studies of movements concerned with war and peace, environmental issues, race and ethnicity, women and LGBTQ issues, social justice, as well as resistance movements to political, social, and cultural change.

Course Offered: Fall (even years)

Political, scientific, social, legal, and economic dimensions of international resource use, pollution, and Environmental Studies development.

Course Offered: Fall (odd years)

An examination of contemporary issues that affect organizations. Essential topics include environmental stewardship, social responsibility of the organization, effects and implications of globalization, the status of individual freedom within the organization, diversity, and the ramifications of technological change. This seminar course will be organized around student discussion and topical papers.

Course Offered: Spring

This is a hands-on course that provides experience in fieldwork, including both cultural resources/archaeological studies and environmental studies. Students will learn field methodology and techniques including survey, mapping, data collection, data analysis, curation, and report preparation for archaeological and environmental sites and data. This course requires sometimes physical work in outdoor settings. Permission Required.

Course Offered: Irregular