Seminar in Humanities

Class                                      ZAP/Section               Time                                       Location   

HUM 4993                               1376/001                     Thurs. 2-4:30                          BH 201     

 

Faculty                        Office                         E-Mail                                                             Phone/Voice Mail

Dr. Dial-Driver                         BH 201A                      edial-driver@rsu.edu                          (918) 343-7747

 

Appointments/Office Hours: If you need to see me, please call or come by. Occasionally I will not be available during regular office hours because of other campus commitments. Please leave a message on the sheet of paper on the office door or on my voice mail. I will return your call as soon as possible.

 

Course Description (RSU Catalog): HUM 4993: Seminar in Humanities

            A reading, research, and/or lecture seminar on a particular topic, period, or genre. Seminars will require extensive reading of, and reports on, primary and secondary works and/or research project(s). Student discussion will be paramount. Prerequisite: senior status.

 

Course Introduction: This course is an advanced seminar in the humanities. It is designed to be part of the culmination of your academic experience at Rogers State University in the Bachelor of Arts, Liberal Arts program (in fact, if you are not a senior BALA student, you need special permission from the professor just to enroll in this class). As such, you are expected to enter this class with knowledge already acquired throughout your tenure in the Liberal Arts program.  The work we will undertake in this class is not, therefore, meant as “new” information; instead, it will serve as a vehicle for you to display successfully acquired knowledge and continue to think critically about what it means to study and hold a degree in the Liberal Arts.

 

In the above description, this seminar falls somewhere between a Reading Seminar and a Research Seminar. The crucial fact to note is that student discussion—your contribution—“is paramount.”

 

The specific topic for this year's Humanities Seminar is Identity: The Search. This will be a “paired” course. We will read a number of literary and scholarly works and watch the films that were made from them. Each of the films and works will deal with the quest for self and for identity in some way. We will be looking at how self (identity) is defined in various contexts and how people deal with the search for it. In each unit we will examine two works, and we will spend the vast majority of our time reading, discussing, and writing about the meaning and significance of those works. That means that the course will require a great deal of work on your part, but it will be worth it.

 

Our approach to all that we see, read, or discuss will center on its instructive or intellectual potential. Since literature and film, like other arts, have the power to amuse, challenge, and offend, it is possible you may be disturbed at various times during the semester by the material with which we deal. Many of the materials we will study in this course were written for adult audiences. Materials may contain sexual references, violence, and emotionally-charged material, as well as religious and cultural values that may differ from our own. If you wish to ensure against exposure to or discussion of such materials, you should enroll in another course.

 

The CFA faculty are invited to be a part of the seminar. Thus, faculty members may attend a class or two if they are particularly interested in the topic(s) under discussion.

 

You will be expected to know and use literary and art terms that appear in the Guide to College Writing and which you have discussed in humanities, art, literature, and other liberal arts classes.  

 

In addition to the class-specific work, you will also write and defend your proposal for the Capstone Project. While the actual Capstone Project will be completed next semester, you must have your proposal approved this semester. Successful completion of this class is contingent upon your proposal being accepted by the Capstone Committee. 


 

Textbooks and Resources             

Alexie, Sherman. The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven. Perennial, 1994. ISBN: 0060976241

Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid’s Tale. New York: Anchor, 1998. ISBN: 038549081X

de Saint-Exupéry, Antoine. The Little Prince. Harvest Books, 2000. ISBN: 0156012197

Dial-Driver, Emily. Guide to College Writing.  Reno: BentTree,2006. (You should already own a copy of this work.)

Dick, Philip K. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Del Rey, 1996. ISBN: 0345404475

Goldman, William. The Princess Bride: S. Morgenstern's Classic Tale of True Love and High Adventure (The 'Good Parts' Version). Ballantine Books, 1998. ISBN: 034543014X

Hillenbrand, Laura. Seabiscuit: An American Legend. Ballantine Books, 2002. ISBN: 0449005615

Nasar, Sylvia. A Beautiful Mind: The Life of Mathematical Genius and Nobel Laureate John Nash. Simon & Schuster, 2001. ISBN: 0743224574

You may also choose to use Harmon and Holman’s A Handbook to Literature (10th ed.) used in Literary Traditions

 

Library Materials: Materials relating to this course, including the texts, may be on reserve in the library.

 

Names and phone numbers of classmates          

___________________________________  __________________________________

___________________________________  __________________________________

___________________________________  __________________________________

 

Teaching Methods and Evaluation Instruments

 

You will read texts, watch films, take part in discussions, do research, write essays, evaluate research, evaluate writing, do projects, evaluate projects, and take tests.

 
Learning Objectives: In accordance with the Rogers State University mission and the mission of the Department of Communications and Fine Arts, this course is intended to provide the opportunity for students to develop and display critical and creative thinking; multicultural exposure; global perspective, an appreciation for the diverse views of art, knowledge, culture, and the world; and effective communication skills, both written and oral.
       
        This course leads to the following outcomes:

1.      Seminar in Humanities is designed for those students aspiring to baccalaureate degrees.

2.      Seminar in Humanities is designed to build and display effective communication skills and creative and critical thinking in an atmosphere of academic freedom which encourages interaction in a positive academic climate.

3.      Seminar in Humanities is designed to create opportunities for cultural, intellectual, and personal enrichment for students.

 

During the semester, you will study film and written works that relate to those films. You will

1. Apply literary and film terms about works of literature and film

2. Criticize, analyze, and evaluate works of literature and film in a number of ways, including through formal writings

3. Explain through a variety of formats, including formal presentation, material relating to film and literary works to the class

4. Design, organize, and manage class discussions about literary and film works

5. Synthesize and evaluate information about literature and film

6.  Successfully propose a project to be completed in the Capstone/Portfolio class

 


 

Assessment Tools

By the end of the semester you will have

Fulfilled Objective

1. passed tests on the reading and study material

 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 8

2. written acceptable, documented paper(s) using MLA format

 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5

3. presented researched papers to the class

 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8

4. created projects related to literary and film works

 1, 2, 3, and 4

5. presented projects related to literary and film works to the class

 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8

6. organized material for class discussion of literary and film works

 1, 2, 3, 4, and 7

7. led class discussion of material on literary and film works

 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, and 8

8. presented proposal for capstone project

 6, 9, and 8

           

Mid-Level (Class Assessment): Students will be assessed on their ability to apply literary and film terms and facts about works of literature and film; to analyze, to criticize, and to evaluate works of literature and film in a number of ways; and to respond to questions about literature and film, especially in realms of synthesis and evaluation. 

Exit Assessment: Students will be assessed on their ability to apply literary and film terms and facts about works of literature and film; to analyze, to criticize, and to evaluate works of literature and film in a number of ways; and to respond to questions about literature and film, especially in realms of synthesis and evaluation. 

 

Grading

 

Standards of Achievement: All student work will be held to the following academic criteria.


 

Accuracy of information

Organization and clarity of thoughts

Depth of critical thinking and observation

Satisfaction of defined requirements (deadlines, etc.)

Acceptable writing mechanics

Fidelity of work (no plagiarism, cheating, etc.)

Evidence of creative or innovative thinking

Effective cooperative learning


 

 

Grade Composition: Grades will be based on the following:

         Research essay         100 points each          200 points                  

         Project                         100 points each          200 points

         Class lead                   100 points each          200 points

         Capstone proposal                                         100 points

         Test                                                                 100 points

         Participation                15 per class                225 points

                                                                              1025 points

 

You must complete and pass all assigned work to receive credit for and pass the class.

 

Grading Scale and Academic Profiles: The Communications and Fine Arts Division has adopted a standard grading scale: 90-100%  = A; 80-89% = B; 70-79% = C; 60-69% = D; 59% and below = F

 

Papers will be graded on structure, grammar, spelling, punctuation, and logic as well as content.  Content cannot make up for technique, nor can technique make up for content.

 

NOTICE:  If you make one of the mistakes listed in the Guide to College Writing as "mistakes NEVER to make," you will lose 10 points.  DON'T MAKE THESE MISTAKES! 

 

 

You need to keep track of your grades and not ask "How am I doing?" or "What is my average?"  Do not expect to call and ask about a grade.  Grades will not be posted.  If you want your final grade earlier than it is sent to you by the Registrar’s office, you can give me a stamped, self-addressed envelope and I will send it to you.

 

Academic Descriptions

Grade

Descriptor

Description

A

Excellent

Students receiving an “A” can be considered to have exhibited extraordinary effort in class and scholarship exceeding the expectations of the instructor and to have exhibited most or all of the following: to have participated regularly and on time (missed fewer than one class period); to have participated fully in peer evaluations and in discussions, revealing personal initiative in both; to have used well-supported and well-structured logical arguments in essay writing; to have revealed a grasp of mechanics that prevents errors; to have revealed depth of critical thought and observation; to have exhibited timeliness in turning in assignments; to have revealed strong interest in intellectual, cultural, and personal growth by reading and discussing assigned material; to have shown consistent improvement in academics.

B

Above Average

Students receiving a “B” can be considered to have exhibited above-average effort in class, revealing noticeable improvement in academics, and showing accurate and complete scholarship. The student will have exhibited most or all of the following: have participated regularly (not missed more than one class meeting) and on time; have participated honestly and solidly in peer evaluations and in class discussion; have used supported and structured logical arguments in essay writing; have revealed a grasp of mechanics that prevents many errors; have revealed critical thought and observation; have exhibited a moderate grasp of timeliness in turning in assignments; have revealed interest in intellectual, cultural, and personal growth by reading and discussing assigned material.

C

Average

Students receiving a “C” can be considered to have exhibited average effort in class, performing satisfactorily but not above average, with some self-direction, and have shown signs of academic progress, meeting assignment parameters accurately. The student will have exhibited most or all of the following: participated regularly (not missed more than two class meetings) and on time; participated willingly in peer evaluations and in class discussion; have used supported and structured arguments in essay writing; have revealed an average grasp of mechanics that prevents most errors; have revealed average critical thought and observation; have exhibited a moderate grasp of timeliness in turning in assignments; have revealed average interest in intellectual, cultural, and personal growth by reading and discussing assigned material.

D

Below Average

Students receiving a “D” can be considered to have exhibited some effort in class, but not enough to show fully engagement with the subject and with the course material, showing little or no initiative and academic improvement, and not meeting the scholarship requirements of assignments. The student will have exhibited most or all of the following: have participated somewhat in peer evaluations and in class discussion; have participated in all but three class meetings, and usually on time; have used some structured and supported arguments in essay writing; have revealed a sub-standard grasp of mechanics that prevents only some errors; have revealed below average critical thought and observation; have exhibited some grasp of timeliness in turning in assignments; have revealed below average interest in intellectual, cultural, and personal growth by reading and discussing assigned material; have not met the scholarship requirements of assignments; have not shown initiative; have not revealed academic improvement.

F

Unsatisfactory

Students receiving an “F” can be considered to have exhibited little or no desire to pass the course. This will usually involve poor participation (missed more than the equivalent of three class meetings) and little or no effort to attempt improvement as well as scholarship deficiencies and lack of effort to complete assignments.

 

Sample Essays: The Guide to College Writing includes essays in an appendix. Each of these essays is the equivalent of an “A” or “B“ essay for Composition I and/or Composition II.

 

Academic Integrity: Plagiarism is one type of academic dishonesty.  Plagiarism is representing someone else's ideas or work as your own.  To avoid plagiarism, when you use someone else's data, arguments, designs, words, ideas, project, etc., you must make it clear that the work originated with someone else by citing the source. Review The Guide to College Writing for documentation conventions. See the material in the syllabus. Also review the Student Code of Responsibilities and Conduct published by Rogers State University for a full discussion of “Code of Academic Conduct” and plagiarism penalties. For a definition and examples of plagiarism and how to avoid it, see the  latest edition of the Guide to College Writing.

 

Americans with Disabilities Act: Rogers State University is committed to providing students with disabilities equal access to educational programs and services.  Before any educational accommodation can be provided, any student who has a disability that he or she believes will require some form of accommodation must do the following:  1) inform the professor of each class of such need; and 2) register for services to determine eligibility for assistance with the Office of Student Affairs, located in the Student Union. Students needing more information about Student Disability Services should contact: Director of Student Development, Office of Student Affairs, Rogers State University, 918-343-7579.

 

Computer Writing Labs: Computers are available in the University Preparatory Academy, Stratton Taylor Library, and Student Support Services, and in BH 205.

 

Class Conventions

 

Communication Protocol: You may not submit electronic documents. You may ask limited questions by e-mail.  Please make sure you label the subject of any e-mail clearly in the subject line.

 

Attendance Policy: Attendance is vital. You cannot discuss if you are not here. Absences will affect your grade. Please tell me if you come in late; otherwise you will be marked absent. If you are more than 10 minutes late, you will not receive credit for attendance for that class meeting.

 

Extra Credit and Late Work: No extra credit will be offered. Late work will lose 10% per day.

 

Expectations

·         Come to class prepared, having read the material to be discussed, ready to discuss and participate, bringing appropriate supplies, such as texts, paper, pen, etc.

·         If you have a paper due, come to class with your paper assembled and stapled for submission. All assignments should be properly assembled to hand in at the beginning of the class period in which they are due. Bring the assignments assembled and stapled, completely ready to submit. Do not expect time to finish or to assemble or to staple assignments during class. Assignments turned in more than five minutes after the beginning of the class period are late.

·         Assignments should be typed.  Other assignments should be typed or written on the front of loose-leaf notebook paper in ink. (Spiral notebook paper is always unacceptable.)

·         Please do not use ANY tobacco products in the classroom; do not wear hats or caps. 

·         Do not bring pagers or cell phones with audible notifications into the classroom.

·         Failure to comply with these requests will be seen as denoting lack of respect for the class, the instructor, and your classmates.

 

Closure Statement: The schedule and procedures in this course are subject to change in the event of extenuating circumstances.

 

 


 

Schedule and Text Assignments

 

Each assignment should be done by the first day of the class week.

 

Lesson/Subject                                                                                                                 Date

 

Week

Assignment

 1 Introduction and The Little Prince

Aug. 17

The Little Prince (children’s story)

 2 The Little Prince discussion

Aug. 24

 

 3 The Princess Bride

Aug. 31

The Princess Bride (novel)

 

 4 The Princess Bride discussion

 

Sept. 7

Contact mentor possibilities

 5 Bladerunner     

    Due: Mentor contract

Sept. 14

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

 

 6 Androids/Bladerunner discussion

Sept. 21

 

 7 The Handmaid’s Tale

Sept. 28

The Handmaid’s Tale

Prepare to submit 5 copies of proposal

 8 The Handmaid’s Tale discussion

     Due: 5 copies proposal

Oct. 5

Prepare to present proposal

 9 Proposal presentations

Oct. 12

 

10 Seabiscuit

Oct. 26

Seabiscuit (written work)

11 Seabiscuit discussion

Nov. 2

 

12 A Beautiful Mind

Nov. 9

A Beautiful Mind (written work)

 

13 A Beautiful Mind discussion

Nov. 16

 

14 Smoke Signals

Nov. 30

The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven

15 Smoke/Lone discussion

Dec. 7

 

16 Final

Dec. 14

You must have a ticket to enter the final.

 

Ticket to the Final

 

Bring, as a ticket to the final, to the final a one-page, typed, no name attached, evaluation of the class. Tell what you liked and dislike about the class, what you think should be added, deleted, or changed. Make any suggestions you might have. Remember, if you don’t make suggestions, future students cannot benefit from your insight and experience. I will not see these evaluations until after the grades go to the Registrar’s office.

 

Assignment Directions

 

Scheduling: You must produce and present one researched essay and one project before mid-term and one after mid-term.

 

Please do not wait until the last minute to do assignments because you will run out of time. This is very important.

 

This class is a valuable one for the future; in order for it to be most valuable to you, it’s necessary for you to do a certain amount of writing and a great deal of work. That may not be your idea of the best way to have a life, but it is and will be useful!

 


 

Academic Research Essays

 

Before beginning the academic papers, read the sections in the Guide to College Writing on "The Research Paper" and “Writing about Literature.”

 

The length for this paper is five to ten pages of text, typed. (You will include a Works Cited page that is part of the paper but is not a page of text.) Do research. Decide on the limited topic you intend to handle and on which you can find sufficient resource material. Do NOT do a biography of an author. The only appropriate biographical material is material pertinent to a point that you are making.

 

You should use five or more sources in the paper, three of which must be print sources, one of which must be an Internet or other electronic source. (General encyclopedias are not appropriate sources, not even the ones on the Internet.) Be sure that you include not only paraphrased but also quoted material. Use MLA‑format documentation. For each paper, submit, in addition to the paper, any and all drafts and planning you produced, as well as copies of the sources you used, with the information you used highlighted. You will not receive credit for the submitted paper unless you have furnished highlighted copies of source material.

 

We will not be studying the research paper or how to write one. Make sure you read the noted sections in the Guide to College Writing. You will be graded on the conventions of essay writing, documentation, etc. You will also be graded on evidence of creative and critical thinking.

 

Papers should be clear, specific, and evidential, with well-supported points. Content is worth 100%; however, not more than 70% is possible on a written project or a written portion of a project if the errors below are present:

- 10% for mechanical (grammatical, punctuation, spelling, etc.) error

- 10% for sentence syntax error

- 10% for source or documentation error

- 10% for project not clearly and logically structured, with required divisions and labeling

See the Grading Rubric(s) in the Guide to College Writing for other specifics.

 

 

Projects

 

Choose a work or a theme running through a work or series of works. Using the selection(s) as a basis, develop the equivalent of a ten-page paper. You may choose to do a project that is visual, tactile, imagistic. You may choose to do a creative work of fiction or poetry related to the material at hand; or you may choose to do a work of art, a piece of music, a painting—whatever you decide works best for that particular unit. Hopefully, you will choose two different means of response for the two projects. The purpose of this project is to respond to and illuminate the work(s) for other class members. You will be asked to discuss in your presentation, among other questions, 1) why you choose the work(s) you choose, (2) how you think your project illuminates/explicates the work(s) you choose, and 3) the significance of each element of your project. Primarily, I want to see that you have done some critical and creative thinking about the work in question. Your grade will reflect the creative and critical thinking

 

You must label the project with the title of the work(s) you are dealing with. In addition to the project itself, you will also submit a page that contains your name, the name and a one-paragraph description of the project, and the name of the work(s) you have dealt with. Be creative. Take chances.

 


 

 

Class Facilitation/Presentations/Discussion Leader

 

You will be leading two class discussions during the semester, one before mid-term and one after mid-term. During those seminar meetings, you will be giving information to the class and eliciting class discussion. Between information presented and discussion, you must cover

  • an analysis of the written work, including literary elements
  • an analysis of the film, including literary, visual and aural elements
  • a comparison of the two works
  • the relation of the works to the theme of the class, which is Identity: The Quest.

 

You must reveal the ability to analyze, synthesize, criticize, synergize, and evaluate. Critical and creative thinking are required.

 

Class Participation

 

Each class period will be “worth” 15 points. The awarding of those points will be based on the judgment of the professor, based on your making appropriate and illuminating comments that contribute to the class discussion. (See attached Johnston’s “Participating in Seminars” for general information on participation.)

 

Capstone Proposal

 

General Information: The capstone project includes a substantial body of work gathered over the four years of the bachelor’s degree program. (That’s the portfolio.) The project itself is at least one original work of substance. The purpose of this work is to reveal the unity of educational experience, not only of the first three years of the program but of the last year of the program in which you will take the capstone course and the Seminar in Humanities. Your portfolio collection may include creative pieces in graphics, sculpture, painting, drawing, fiction, poetry, essay, play, novel, etc., and/or researched pieces from any class. The original capstone work should be created during the capstone semester. (The Capstone course will include work in addition to project work.)

 

Proposal: The capstone project will begin with a proposal. Your proposal paper must do the following:

  1. describe your portfolio,
  2. identify what new, original work you will do for the capstone project,
  3. present a timeline for completion,
  4. and discuss how the portfolio (including the capstone project) reflects your educational experience.

 

Additionally, the first page of your proposal should be an abstract, a one-page summary of the proposal that briefly addresses all four items listed above. The entire document should be between ten and twelve pages in length (double-spaced, normal font, normal margins, etc.).

 

The proposal may become the basis for the reflective paper. The paper should reflect the process and philosophy that you used in gathering the portfolio and discuss the meaning and philosophy behind the works in the portfolio. The reflective paper must include an introduction, including a short biography (as relating to the portfolio and the project), and explanations of the way in which 

·          elements are related, for a multi-element project

·          portfolio elements are related to the capstone project

·          your specific educational experience contributed to your growth and to the project.

 


 

Portfolio: During the Capstone course, you will compile and present a portfolio that includes the following:

  • collected body of work (approximately 10-12 works) from your undergraduate studies, including visual, written, and oral elements, one of which may have to have a culture/humanities topic;
  • one new, significant, original work (25-35 pages of written material, and/or an equivalent project in the visual arts, as appropriate);
  • a reflective paper (10-12 pages) that discusses the relevance the new work has to the portfolio and how the portfolio reflects your educational experience.

 

Presentations: The proposal (in Seminar in Humanities), portfolio, capstone project, and reflective paper (all in Capstone) will be presented. The presentations will occur before the BALA Capstone Committee, the BALA faculty, and all interested BALA students.

 

Grading: In Capstone, the professor will grade most of your work. However, the portfolio, new project in the portfolio, and presentation will be graded by the CFA Senior Experience Committee, a Department of Communications and Fine Arts committee composed of members of the department from various disciplines. The proposal will also be graded by the Senior Experience Committee.

 

Each step of the process must go through not only the instructor of this class but also your mentor. Please make sure you check each step with your mentor before submitting your proposal, your project, etc. You will be choosing your mentor from members of the department. You must choose a mentor who is in the field in which you are planning to work. After you have thought about with whom you would like to work and who would be the most appropriate person to mentor your particular project, then you will check with those member(s) of the department in order to negotiate mentorship. No member of the department will be asked to mentor more than one student. Any member of the department is free to decline mentorship.

 

The portfolio will contain all of the following:

 

 

Minimum Requirements

Proposal

10-12 pages of text, plus Works Cited and abstract

Reflective Statement

10-12 pages of text

Portfolio Collection

10 pieces with a unifying theme

Original Capstone Work

25-25 pages of original work (or equivalent visual project), reflecting unifying theme and student’s philosophy

 

            Capstone project/portfolio/presentation will be graded as follows:

Project                    50%

Presentation           15%

Portfolio                  15 %

Reflective Paper     20%

 

Proposal Feedback: You will receive feedback on the proposal, that is, you will find out if your proposal is acceptable, not acceptable, or acceptable with changes. Pay very close attention to the information the committee passes on to you. If the project is acceptable, please stay with your plan. If you make substantial changes from what you plan to what you actually do, then you need to let the committee/capstone professor know. If the project is not acceptable, you will have to re-submit and re-present the proposal until the proposal is found acceptable. If the proposal is acceptable with changes, the committee will suggest that you add, delete, change, emend, etc.; please do so. If you do not follow the guidelines given to you, then you will probably find that the committee will not be pleased with the capstone project. This would work to your detriment.

You will also receive feedback from your mentor on your project. Pay attention to those suggestions as well. If you ignore the suggestions, you are likely to find that the project grade will suffer.

 

You will not receive feedback on the final project, except to the extent that you have passed or failed. The committee will not return copies of the written work to you.

 

Tests

 

You will also be taking one test in Seminar, which will be essay and comprehensive. On the test, you will be asked questions designed to elicit your understanding of the material covered in class. In addition, those questions will ask you to go beyond simply reiterating material covered in the class and ask you to incorporate what you have learned into reflection on your own life and/or work experience(s). You will be required to synthesize the material and reveal that you have the ability to use that material in a world-view. If, in the opinion of the instructor, the class has performed well in discussions, participating when that is appropriate and leading when that is appropriate, then the tests may be waived and a film and discussion of that film offered during that class period instead. 

 

An Open Letter to Students

 

            Attending college is analogous to being employed. Success on the job is achieved only with hard work and effort. This is also true of college.

            Your employer expects you to be on the job every day, on time, and prepared to work. You are allowed only a specific number of sick days each year after which your pay is “docked.” This is also true in classes. Regular and prompt attendance/participation is essential.

            Meetings are an essential part of the workplace culture, and everyone is expected to attend regularly and to contribute to the discussion. If you miss an excessive number of meetings and/or do not share information, your employment success is in jeopardy. The same holds true for this class. You are not only expected to attend all of our on-line “meetings,” but you are expected to contribute to the discussion. This requires that you come prepared to discuss the assigned material. Failure to do so will put your success in jeopardy.

            Your employer requires you to submit all reports on time. Failure to do so will endanger your employer’s business and your success. The same is true for this class. All “reports” (papers, etc.) are due at the scheduled time (see syllabus). If, for a justified reason, you will not be able to meet the time schedule, you must notify me, just as you would contact your employer if you needed an extension. However, as in the workplace, such extensions do not come without a cost. Extensions result in a decrease in your “salary” (grade).

            Performance reviews occur periodically in the workplace, and your employer determines the degree of your success during these reviews. Such is the case in this class. The “performance reviews” for this class are papers and other assignments. These reviews require you to show not only your knowledge of the material, but also your ability to use this knowledge. Your “pay” (grade) depends on the quality of your performance.

            If you attend class regularly, participate in class discussions, and submit all materials, well prepared and in a timely fashion, you have the potential to excel in this class. I am looking forward to working with you and to learning with you. I am always available if you need assistance.

Good luck! Good writing!

 

adapted, with permission, from Bremer, Joyce C. “The Responsible Student.” Innovation Abstracts 20.17 (4 Sep. 1998): 1.

 

 

 


 

Name(s): _______________________                      Name of work:  _________________________ Author of work: _________________________       Genre of work:  _________________________

 

Plot

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Conflict(s)

Flashback(s)

Foreshadowing

Epiphany

Resolution

 

Climax

Denouement

Character(s)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Characterization: Flat/Round

Style

Tone

Allusion(s)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paradoxes

Point of View

Noteworthy Language

Setting

Image(s)

Symbol(s)

Theme(s)

Evaluation:

affective

mimetic

aesthetic

significance

integrity and originality

 

Interpretation:

literal

biographical

historical

sociological

psychological

religious

Personal Reaction

               

 


 

Language Terms

 

Literary Term

Example

Comment

Alliteration

 

 

Allusion

 

 

Anomaly

 

 

 

Assonance

 

 

 

Cacophony

 

 

 

Consonance

 

 

 

Euphony

 

 

 

Hyperbole

 

 

 

Image

 

 

 

Metaphor

 

 

 

Onomatopoeia

 

 

 

Oxymoron

 

 

 

Paradox

 

 

 

Personification

 

 

 

Simile

 

 

 

Style

 

 

 

Symbol

 

 

 

Theme

 

 

 

Tone

 

 

 

 


 

Film Elements

 

Character

Plot Structure

Cinematography

 

Casting

 

 

 

Inciting Incident

Lighting

 

Characters

 

 

 

Points of Conflict

 

 

 

Sound

 

Character development

 

 

Types of conflict

 

 

 

Music

 

Twists

Camera angle

 

 

 

 

Acting decisions

 

 

 

Climax

 

Cuts

 

Language use

 

Foreshadowing

 

 

Actor’s decisions

 

Resolution

 

 

Director’s decisions

 

 

 

 

Comments

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Denouement

 

 

 

Images

Symbols

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Themes

 

 


 

TYPES OF LITERARY EVALUATION

       

Literary works may be evaluated in a number of ways. You may choose to evaluate in any manner you wish. However, if you are feeling insecure about evaluation and if you wish some concrete guidelines, you may use the Bedford Glossary of Critical and Literary Terms (which was required for the Literary Traditions class) and look up criticism and evaluation. The following list of terms may serve as an aid as well.

       

Affective

                        Affective evaluation is evaluation of emotional appeal.

                       Does the work emotionally involve you? Were you excited and interested?

 

            Aesthetic       

                        Aesthetic evaluation is evaluation on artistic principles of complexity, unity, and economy.

                                   A work is simple when only a few of the possibilities of a situation are being dealt with. A work is complex when the author attempts to include or suggest many facets. A work is unified when all the parts contribute to the whole of the work. A work is economical when the writer says as much as possible in the fewest words.

 

Integrity and originality

 

           Evaluation of the integrity and originality of the author is based on the judgment of whether the author is using trite ideas and formula plots, etc., or if the author is using new and original ways to present ideas.

 

Mimetic

           Mimetic evaluation is evaluation of plausibility or verisimilitude.

                       Does the work seem as if it could have happened, given the parameters set up by the writer? Does the work seem to present the truth, given the parameters set up by the author? A fantasy may be plausible and "real" if the reader can accept it.

 

Significance

           Evaluation by significance is related to mimetic evaluation.

                       The work is judged on how significant, how penetration, how useful the statement about experience is. Is what the author says of any importance?


 

Study Questions

Seminar in Humanities

 

 

 

Synthesis

 

What are the common themes, aside from “identity,” running through two or more of the works studied this semester?

 

What are the elements common to two or more works studied this semester?

 

How are elements of the “identity: the quest” theme present in each of the works studied this semester?

 

How does reading each work build on the knowledge and information you gain from reading each the previous works? How does the class become a cumulative experience?

 

Considering that you have limited experience and based on the limited experience that you have had in reading works for this class, what can you conclude about identity and the quest for identity?

 

What have you learned from the class as a whole?

 

What are the realistic elements present in each of the works studied this semester?

 

How does language color how we react to what we hear and see?

 

Each of the works studied in this class deals with the idea of identity in some manner. What does each work say about identity? Group the works into classes of ideas and discuss them in terms of the works.

 

People have a tendency to make events and lives into “stories.” How does each work studied in this class do this? How do these “stories” reveal identity and the quest for identity?

 

What function do different linguistic perspectives reveal in each of the works studied? Using several of the works, discuss how language “informs” the work and the reader.

 


 

Participating in Seminars

 

A seminar is a small group of people (usually less than 20) who meet to discuss together a particular subject. It is, first and foremost, a conversation among people who share a common interest in expanding their understanding of idea, a book, a painting, or some other specific topic.

The seminar session has a number of specific purposes. First, it is designed to create a situation where the participants share their views about something very specific, so that everyone's understanding of that focus is expanded, improved, and deepened. Second, a seminar seeks to promote the skills of conversation, a complex set of habits and attitudes which, in large part, determine our abilities to deal with others in a group setting. And finally a seminar tries to foster an ongoing discussion which will continue outside the classroom (in the cafeteria, over dinner, in the pub).

In the setting of an educational institution, the rationale for seminar-style learning rests on the well-known fact that students learn far more from talking and listening to each other than they do from listening passively to a lecturer. And, more importantly, they remember what they learn in a seminar far better than they do with lectures. In addition, the seminar seeks to enrich the student's social experiences at the institution, to make sure people have the best opportunity for forming friendships of various kinds and for discovering others with whom they can carry on meaningful conversations (and not just about school work).

Successful seminars, however, do not just happen. Because of the complex nature of the social interactions, those participating have to work to create and sustain a conversational setting in which, individually and collectively, the aims of the seminar are realized as fully as possible. This demand requires from each of the participants a continuing commitment to making the enterprise work.

 

The Ground Rules for a Seminar

 

While a seminar, like a conversation, is in many respects a good deal more relaxed and free-wheeling than, say, a lecture, it does nevertheless have some unwritten rules. Participants need to be aware of these in order to understand the procedures and responsibilities of all seminar participants.

1. The seminar is, above all, a gathering of equals. That means that everyone has an equal right to be heard and an equal responsibility for keeping the seminar working properly. While the seminar will normally have a leader, usually the instructor (although she may delegate the position), that leader is one among equals. The leader's duties usually involve getting the seminar started, occasional prompting, if necessary, and winding things up at the end. Beyond that, however, the leader has no particular duty greater than anyone else's for keeping the conversation going in a useful manner. Hence, if you are experiencing some problems in the seminar, the first question to consider is this: What can you, as an equal member of the group, do to help remedy the situation?

2. Seminars should be informal, but also polite. That is, people's views should be treated with respect (which does not mean that they cannot be challenged), and the normal courtesies of polite conversation should be observed. If there is a breach of such politeness, each member of the group has the responsibility for pointing it out and helping to remedy it. It is important to remember that courtesy is not just a matter of verbal niceties. One's courtesy also manifests itself in one's tone, bodily posture, and particular activities while someone else is speaking, so that things like slouching, sitting away from the table, eating, knitting, yawning, and so on can affect the discussion for the worse.

3. A seminar conversation involves everyone at the table. Therefore, remarks are directed to all participants, not just to the leader of the seminar or to any other person in particular.

4. While seminars have no predetermined structure, they usually have a very specific focus (a text, a particular part of a text, a single issue). Hence, the business of the seminar is to stay on that focus. Digressions are not unusual (and sometimes useful), but often they need to be controlled and, if necessary, ended, so that the attention of the participants may direct itself once again onto the specific focus (e.g., a particular part of the text under discussion). Here again, all participants have an equal responsibility for dealing with any problems of this sort.

 

How to Be a Good Seminar Participant

 

Participating well in seminars is not easy. Most students require a good deal of practice in order to improve significantly. The following points should help you to focus your attention on some things directly relevant to good seminar participation.

1. To begin with, there are some obvious basic points. Participants should arrive on time and stay for the length of the seminar (interruptions are irritating, and missing part of the conversation can lead to repetition). You should have the correct text with you in the proper edition (working with different translations or with editions having different page numbers can make providing references difficult and slow down the process). Participants should also attend carefully to what is going on, ready to contribute and displaying interest in the proceedings.  You should not use the seminar as your lunch hour (i.e., by bringing in something to eat while others are speaking) or as an opportunity to catch up on some sleep or to write a letter to your relatives.

2. Seminars require preparation. To be a good seminar participant you need to have read the material (preferably more than once) and to have thought about it. You should be bringing to the meeting some considered reflections about the topic under discussion, perhaps even some notes you have jotted down. It is particularly irritating for those who have so prepared themselves to have to listen to someone who has not read the material but who wishes to deliver a series of opinions on it anyway or who needs to be told the story line or the argument. One of the best ways to prepare well for a seminar is to meet with one or two people beforehand to discuss the material (perhaps over lunch or the evening before).

3. In preparing for the seminar, think carefully about the lead-in focus question, if there is one. You might jot down a couple of points you could raise in connection with it. In addition, as you read the assigned text, make a note of anything you find really puzzling or irritating or exciting, something that might form the basis for a question or comment you would want to ask the seminar participants to respond to. You might like also to think about any useful comparisons with other books or characters from other books which you might like to introduce. You do not have to come to the seminar with your mind absolutely made up about the text under discussion (that's probably not a good idea). But you should bring a record detailing some aspects of your engagement with the text. You might not get to use these, but you should have them available.

4. The most difficult and important skill in effective seminar participation is good listening. You need to attend carefully to what others are saying. And then you need to learn to respond intelligently and helpfully. A seminar is not just a collection of individual points of view declared one after the other. It has a rhythm, often an unpredictable rhythm, which is established, above all, by the ways in the which the participants respond to each other. If someone's contribution is puzzling, then ask him to continue, taking care of a particular trouble you have with a point he raised. If the contribution is very good, tell the speaker so. If you disagree or have an alternative point, then put that on the table. As in a conversation, in a seminar the participant has to be prepared to be flexible, adjusting her participation to what is happening moment by moment throughout the seminar. This is the major challenge of the process.

5. Participants need to be careful of interrupting someone else before he is finished. This habit can close some participants down so that they are reluctant to contribute. By the same token, participants should recognize that they have the responsibility for keeping the discussion focused on the matter at hand. Thus, you should, when necessary, challenge the relevance and the direction of certain remarks. Just because you need to be polite does not mean you cannot be firm in requesting a return to the main point or to a previous point which has been abandoned too quickly.

6. It is entirely appropriate in a seminar to decline to respond if someone asks you a direct question. If you have nothing relevant to say on the point, there is no need to pretend. Simply decline the invitation, and let the seminar continue.

7. Good seminar participation does not depend upon the frequency or length of one's remarks. In fact, the person who is always ready to jump in at the slightest opportunity or whose opinions are delivered at great length can often harm a seminar, first, by excluding others and, second, by encouraging others to rely on her to pick up any slack moments. Hence, you should constantly assess the nature of your contributions. Are you speaking up too much? Do you tend to make very long comments?  Is the group getting to depend upon you too much? In this regard, you need to consider what one might call one's conversational "trigger finger." This phrase refers to the time people take to react to a question or to someone else's point. Some people react very quickly and are ready to jump in with their views almost immediately; other people need some time to reflect on how they are going to respond. If those with a quick conversational trigger finger take over, then the others rarely get a chance to speak up, because by the time they are ready the subject has shifted to something else. So you need to assess how you, in your keenness to respond, may be closing out someone whose reaction time is slower than your own.  If you have already spoken a few times, try delaying your next entry into the conversation, setting up a pause which may invite someone who has not spoken yet to say something.

8. It is particularly important for good seminar participation that you remain alert to the group dynamics in the seminar. For example, some people find it difficult to speak. Perhaps you could invite them to state their views on something, encourage them to pursue a point they have just introduced, or encourage them in some way to join in. The best participants in seminars are those who not only provide interesting and relevant comments themselves but also actively encourage others to join in.

9. Finally, a good seminar participant will reflect upon the nature of her seminar activities, paying particular attention to any habits she is falling into. Are you always sitting in the same chair? Do you always speak up early? Do you have one particular form of comment which you always use? How much time do you usually take to make a point (are you too brief or too long-winded)?  And so on. To derive the best learning from the seminar experience, you should learn to experiment with different styles. For example, if you like to speak up and generally do so quite early, try for a couple of sessions not saying anything too early on, reserving what you have to say until later. If you are by nature someone who initiates the discussion by putting new points on the table, why not try for a few sessions being reactive, that is, taking your cue from points others have raised. If you usually offer only brief remarks, take a chance on expanding your views.  If you are by nature quite talkative and like to offer long comments, think about trying a more concise approach as an experiment.

 

Some Problems Which Can Arise

 

Because seminars are in many respects unstructured and the power is distributed equally among the participants, certain problems can arise. As mentioned before, these problems belong to all participants, and it is thus the responsibility of everyone to remain alert to them and to work at mitigating them, if they do arise.

1. Certain people find putting their own comments into the discussion very difficult and thus tend to remain quiet for the entire seminar, often repeating the process in every seminar. If you are one of these people, you should really try to break your silence. Often a good way to do that is to prepare an answer to the focus question or raise some issues about it in advance and then put your view on the table immediately, before the conversation gets up a full head of steam. Alternatively, you might at some point ask someone to explain a point further, because there is something about it you do not understand. Remember that the seminar is the best educational opportunity you are going to have to learn to speak up; you are among friends and peers, and there is no threat in the situation. So make the most of it, even if you have to force yourself the first few times. Beyond this, those who do not find speaking up a problem have a responsibility for encouraging those that do. If there are people who never speak at all, then everyone is the seminar is failing in some way.

2. A different problem can arise from people who talk too much, who insist on taking up more than their share of the common time. Here again the best solution to this is some self-assessment and self-control. However, if the situation gets out of hand, it is entirely appropriate for someone to point out to the participant that he is taking up too much of the time (perhaps a private word first, rather than as a general group comment). The same is true for people who constantly speak up with irrelevant digressions, taking the attention away from the specific focus of the discussion. Everyone has the duty to pull the discussion back.

3. Absenteeism can be a major problem. A seminar is a social process, and it will not work properly unless all the participants are all there most of the time. This is especially the case when the participants all know each other very well. Hence, missing a seminar is not just a personal loss for you; it deprives everyone in the group. The situation is quite different here from the normal lecture situation. Seminar-style learning places a very high priority on attendance.

4. If there are serious problems, like severe clashes of personality, which you feel are inappropriate to bring up in front of the entire group, then you should talk to the seminar leader (instructor) as soon as possible. You should never continue to participate in a seminar with concealed feelings of frustration or anger. The instructor may be able to do something to help you. Often it may be helpful to talk the matter over with someone else in the seminar first.

 

Marks for Seminar Participation

 

Where seminar participation receives a mark, the criteria the instructor considers include, above all, the following points (which should be obvious from the above remarks):

— preparation for the seminar (Did the student have the book? Did the student read the book and come to the seminar prepared to focus on the particular issues of the day?);

— quality of the participant's contributions to the discussion (Did the student contribute some relevant and intelligent questions, answers, doubts about matters arising in the discussion? Were the remarks relevant? Did any of the remarks challenge the participants in useful ways?);

— nature of the participant's interaction with others (Did the student listen well? Did she encourage others to speak up? Did she ask useful questions or offer helpful follow-up remarks to keep the flow of the conversation polite and relevant?);

—some negative points: excessive digressions; verbal or non-verbal hostility, indifference, boredom, ridicule; over-eagerness to contribute; refusal to put any views on the table. . . .

After each seminar the instructor will assign each student a mark. An absence from seminar or a missing seminar note earns a mark of 0, and there is no way a student can make up for this missing work.  Thus, students should note very, very carefully that in this scheme missing several seminars or seminar notes can really lower the final average and therefore the mark assigned to it. Even if your participation in seminars is very good, missing many seminars or seminar notes can result in a very low mark.

The above remarks, beginning at “Participating in Seminars,” were adapted, with permission, from Ian Johnston, Malaspina University-College, posted Dec. 2002. 

 


 

Student/Mentor Contract for Seminar in Humanities and Capstone

 

 

I understand that I must have a mentor for the portfolio/capstone process and check each step in the portfolio/capstone project process with this mentor. I have specified the mentor below and agree to work closely with my mentor to produce the best artifact(s) possible.

 

I have chosen the following professor as my mentor and have discussed my project plans, his/her responsibilities, and my responsibilities:

 

Mentor Name:  _______________________________         Date: ___________________________

Signature of Mentor:  ________________________________________

 

Name: _____________________________________          Date:  __________________________

Signature: __________________________________________________  

 

           

Capstone/Portfolio Process

Overview

 

 

Seminar in Humanities Semester

 

Portfolio: Initial Collection

 

Project Proposal

 

Project  Proposal Presentation

 

 

 

Capstone Semester

 

Capstone Project

 

Reflective Statement (on education, portfolio, project)

 

Portfolio Completed (Includes Collected Works, Capstone Project, Statement of Portfolio/Education)

 

Capstone Project Presentation

 

 


 

Dear Student:

 

Congratulations on reaching your senior year. This year each of you will compile a capstone portfolio (which will include one significant original work) as the culmination of your undergraduate studies in the liberal arts at Rogers State University. You will compile this portfolio and complete the project during two separate courses, the Humanities Seminar in the fall and the Capstone course in the spring.

 

During the Humanities Seminar, you will create a proposal (a 10-12 page paper) that will accomplish the following:

Additionally, the first page of your proposal should be an abstract, a one-page summary of the proposal that briefly addresses all four items listed above. The entire document should be between ten and twelve pages in length (double-spaced, normal font, normal margins, etc.).

 

During the Capstone course, you will compile and present a portfolio that includes the following:

 

Each of you will select a mentor, one faculty member whom you believe is appropriate to guide you through the capstone process. All mentors must be faculty members of the Department of Communications and Fine Arts. You must have a mentor contract signed by the date listed in the syllabus schedule. At a minimum, you should discuss your proposal with your faculty mentor. You are free to show your proposal paper to your mentor before turning it in, but you are not required to do so.

 

Due to the time-sensitive nature of this assignment, no credit will be given for late work.

 

Fall classes begin in August. Your proposal will be due in September on the date listed in the syllabus schedule. Prior to that date, you must furnish five copies of the proposal. You will present your proposal in October on the date listed in the syllabus. The BALA Senior Experience Committee, other BALA faculty, your class members, and other BALA students will be present to listen to proposal presentations. The Senior Experience Committee will listen to your presentation of your proposal, ask questions about that proposal, and then discuss and evaluate those proposals.

 

You will have five minutes to discuss your proposal, and five minutes to answer questions from the committee (and from other students). Please be prompt, and be prepared.

 

Thank you, and congratulations.


The BALA Senior Experience Committee     


 

Capstone Proposal

 

Scholarly Proposal

Creative Proposal

Topic

Genre

Mentor

Mentor

Research Questions

Unifying Theme

Proposed Thesis (which is the hypothesized answer to the research questions, and which you may not be fully able to articulate at this time)

 

 

Reflective Purpose (personal reason for choosing to do this work, and which will become one of the bases for the reflective paper)

 

Reflective Purpose (personal reason for choosing to do this work)

Critical Foundation (three or more key sources)

 

 

Historical/Critical/Aesthetic Basis (which will become one of the bases for the reflective paper)

Visual Element

 

 

Application: Either why project is necessary for some purpose or a recommendation for further research (which may not be fully articulated at this time)

 

Purpose/Application

Proposed Elements for the Portfolio, with reasons for choosing the elements (which will also become one of the bases for the reflective paper)

 

Proposed Elements for the Portfolio, with reasons for choosing the elements (which will also become one of the bases for the reflective paper)

 

Abstract, one page, which should include statements about topic, mentor, research questions, critical foundation, visual elements, and application

Abstract, one page, which should include statements about topic, mentor, research questions, critical foundation, visual elements, and application

 

 

The goals of the BALA include visual, oral, and theoretical and scholarly elements. Thus, a scholarly or written creative project must include a visual element, both of which must be delineated in the proposal; the visual creative proposal must include a written element, which, in many cases, will be included in the reflective paper. The material due during capstone semester includes a portfolio (demonstrating the depth and breadth of the student’s work across his/her education at RSU), a capstone project (demonstrating mastery of the scholarly/theoretical and visual elements of the BALA goals), and a reflective paper (demonstrating the scholarly/theoretical elements of the project, in the case of a visual project, and, in the case of all projects, the relation of the project to the student’s education and future). To demonstrate mastery of the oral goal, students will present their projects to the CFA faculty, including the BALA Senior Experience Committee, and students. On-line students may choose to fulfill the presentation requirement in one of two ways: 1-They are invited to present projects at the Capstone presentation time on-campus at RSU. 2-They have the alternative of producing a video that will be tendered to the Committee. Presenting at RSU is the best choice because at the presentation answers to Committee questions can inform the Committee of the relevance of project and of the student’s understanding of what he/she has done. Students will receive more feedback and more support at the RSU presentation than from furnishing a video presentation. Presenting at RSU will work to a student’s educational and intellectual and future professional benefit. However, if a student cannot arrange to attend the presentation period(s), a video is an alternative.

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

Student Contract for Seminar in Humanities

 

Read each statement carefully, sign, and submit this contract. This contract must be on file for you to remain enrolled in the class.

 

I have read and understood the guidelines and requirements in the syllabus.

 

I understand that this class is for three hours college credit; this implies three hours of class meeting.

 

I understand that each hour of college credit usually requires two or more hours per week study time outside of class. I understand that means I have a reading/study/research/writing commitment of six or more hours per week outside the three-hour participation requirement.

 

I understand that participation is required.

I understand that attendance is required.

I understand that this class involves deadlines.

I understand that peer critiquing may be required in this class; this means that any work I do for this class may be subject to peer review by my classmates.

 

I understand what plagiarism is, and I understand that strict penalties will incur if I plagiarize material.

 

I understand literary/academic/periodical selections for this class may contain controversial or “offensive” material; this is the nature of some works.

 

 

Name: ___________________________

Date:   ___________________________

Signature: ____________________________          

 

 

 


 

Sign-up Sheet

Seminar in Humanities

 

 

Date: Work

Discussion Leader

Project Presentation

Paper Presentation

 

Aug. 23: Little Prince

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sept 6: Princess Bride

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sept. 20: Androids/Bladerunner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oct. 4: Handmaid’s Tale

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nov 1: Seabiscuit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nov. 12: Beautiful Mind

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dec. 6: Smoke/Lone

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You must sign up to present both academic papers and both projects, one each before mid-term and one each after mid-term. You must present the paper/project in conjunction with the class discussion of the work which you have elected to research/illuminate.


 

 

Proposal: The capstone project will begin with a proposal. Your proposal paper must do the following:

  1. describe your portfolio,
  2. identify what new, original work you will include in the portfolio,
  3. present a timeline for completion,
  4. and discuss how the portfolio (including the new work) reflects your educational experience.

 

Additionally, the first page of your proposal should be an abstract, a one-page summary of the proposal that briefly addresses all four items listed above. The entire document should be between ten and twelve pages in length (double-spaced, normal font, normal margins, etc.).

 

The proposal may become the basis for the reflective paper. The paper should reflect the process and philosophy that you used in gathering the portfolio and discuss the meaning and philosophy behind the works in the portfolio. The reflective paper must include an introduction, including a short biography (as relating to the portfolio and the project), and explanations of the way in which 1-elements are related, for a multi-element project, 2-portfolio elements are related to the capstone project, 3-your specific educational experience contributed to your growth and to the project.

 

Portfolio: During the Capstone course, you will compile and present a portfolio that includes the following:

 

Presentations: The proposal (in Seminar in Humanities), portfolio, capstone project, and reflective paper (all in Capstone) will be presented. The presentation will occur before the BALA Capstone Committee, the BALA faculty, and all interested BALA students.

 

Grading: In Capstone, the professor will grade most of your work. However, the portfolio, new project in the portfolio, and presentation will be graded by the CFA Senior Experience Committee, a Department of Communications and Fine Arts committee composed of members of the department from various disciplines. The proposal will also be graded by the Senior Experience Committee.

 

Each step of the process must go through not only the instructor of this class but also your mentor. Please make sure you check each step with your mentor before submitting your proposal, your project, etc. You will be choosing your mentor from members of the department. You must choose a mentor who is in the field in which you are planning to work. After you have thought about with whom you would like to work and who would be the most appropriate person to mentor your particular project, then you will check with those member(s) of the department in order to negotiate mentorship. No member of the department will be asked to mentor more than one student. Any member of the department is free to decline mentorship.

 

The portfolio will contain all of the following:

 

 

Minimum Requirements

Proposal

10-12 pages of text, plus Works Cited and abstract

Reflective Statement

10-12 pages of text

Portfolio Collection

10 pieces with a unifying theme

Original Capstone Work

25-25 pages of original work (or equivalent visual project), reflecting unifying theme and student’s philosophy

 

            Capstone project/portfolio/presentation will be graded as follows:

Project 60%

Presentation 15%

Portfolio 5 %

Reflective Paper 20%

 

Proposal Feedback: You will receive feedback on the proposal, that is, you will find out if your proposal is acceptable, not acceptable, or acceptable with changes. Pay very close attention to the information the committee passes on to you. If the project is acceptable, please stay with your plan. If you make substantial changes from what you plan to what you actually do, then you need to let the committee/capstone professor know. If the project is not acceptable, you will have to re-submit and re-present the proposal until the proposal is found acceptable. If the proposal is acceptable with changes, the committee will suggest that you add, delete, change, emend, etc.; please do so. If you do not follow the guidelines given to you, then you will probably find that the committee will not be pleased with the capstone project. This would work to your detriment.

 

You will also receive feedback from your mentor on your project. Pay attention to those suggestions as well. If you ignore the suggestions, you are likely to find that the project grade will suffer.

You will not receive feedback on the final project, except to the extent that you have passed or failed. The committee will not return copies of the written work to you.

 

 

 Mentor Sheet