Literary Traditions, Fall 2007

 

Class                          ZAP/Section               Time                                       Location   

ENGL 4453                 1296/001                     TR 11-12:15                BH 201     

 

Faculty                        Office                         E-Mail                                                          Phone/Voice Mail

Dr. Dial-Driver                         BH 201A                      edial-driver@rsu.edu                          (918) 343-7747

 

Appointments/Office Hours: If you need to see me, please call or come by. Occasionally I will not be available during regular office hours because of other campus commitments. Please leave a message on the sheet of paper on the office door or on my voice mail. I will return your call as soon as possible.

 

Course Description (RSU Catalog):  ENG 4453: Literary Traditions

            Literature studied includes, but is not limited to, world, British and American literature approached thematically, regionally, historically, and generically.

 

Course Introduction: Literary Traditions will emphasize various literary themes, processes, and story types that recur in literature through history and across cultures. You will be doing a great deal of reading. This class will consist of a number of activities, among them discussion, tests, papers, creative projects, peer evaluation, and research and research evaluation. The bulk of the work, however, will be in reading and discussion. Our approach to all that we see, read, or discuss will center on its instructive or intellectual potential. Since literature and film, like other arts, have the power to amuse, challenge, and offend, it is possible you may be disturbed at various times during the semester by the material with which we deal. Many of the materials we will study in this course were written for adult audiences. Materials may contain sexual references, violence, and emotionally-charged material, as well as religious and cultural values that may differ from our own. If you wish to ensure against exposure to or discussion of such materials, you should enroll in another course.

You will be expected to know and be able to use literary terms that appear in the Guide to College Writing and which you have discussed in Introduction to Literature, literature survey courses, and Composition II.

           

Textbooks and Resources             

Dial-Driver, Emily. Guide to College Writing.  6th ed., rev. Reno: Bent Tree Press, 2006.

Harmon, William, and C. Hugh Holman. A Handbook to Literature. 10th ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2006. 0131344420

Burgess, Anthony. A Clockwork Orange. W.W. Norton & Company, 1986. 0393312836

Dostoevski, Fyodor. The Brothers Karamazov. Bantam Classic: 1995. 0553212168

Faulkner, William. “Spotted Horses,” “The Bear.” Uncollected Stories of William Faulkner.  Vintage: 1997. 0375701095

Garcia Marquez, Gabriel. Collected Stories, Harper Perennial, 1999. 0-06-093268-6

Kellerman, Jonathan. Savage Spawn: Reflections on Violent Children. Library of Contemporary Thought. Ballantine, 1999. 0345429397

LeGuin, Ursula. The Left Hand of Darkness. Ace, 1991. 0441478123

Shelly, Mary. Frankenstein: 1818 Text Contents. Norton, 1996. 0-393-96458-2

Shakespeare, William. The Tempest. Oxford, 2002. 0198320310

You may order Voices from the Heartland (Taylor, Dial-Driver, Burrage, Emmons) from the University of Oklahoma Press for 40% off the cover price. We will cover Heartland as an additional assignment.  

 

Library Materials: Materials relating to this course, including the texts, may be on reserve in the library.

Names and phone numbers of classmates          

___________________________________  __________________________________

___________________________________  __________________________________

___________________________________  __________________________________


 

Teaching Methods and Evaluation Instruments

 

You will read texts, take part in discussions, write essays, do research, take tests, evaluate research, and do creative projects.

 
Learning Objectives: In accordance with the Rogers State University mission and the mission of the Department of Communications and Fine Arts, this course is intended to provide the opportunity for students to develop and display critical and creative thinking; multicultural exposure; global perspective, an appreciation for the diverse views of art, knowledge, culture, and the world; and effective communication skills, both written and oral.
       
        This course leads to the following outcomes:

1.      Literary Traditions is designed for those students aspiring to baccalaureate degrees.

2.      Literary Traditions is designed to build and display effective communication skills and creative and critical thinking in an atmosphere of academic freedom which encourages interaction in a positive academic climate.

3.      Literary Traditions is designed to create opportunities for cultural, intellectual, and personal enrichment for students.

 

During the semester, you will study these literary genres of short story, drama, poetry, film. You will

1. Apply literary terms

2. Learn and apply facts about works of literature

3. Analyze works of literature

4. Criticize and evaluate works of literature in a number of ways

5. Write criticisms, analyses, and evaluations of literary works

6. respond to questions about literature, especially in realms of synthesis and evaluation

 

Assessment Tools

By the end of the semester you will have

Fulfilled Objective

1. passed two tests on the reading and study material

 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6

2. written acceptable, short, documented paper(s) using MLA format

 1, 2, 3, and 5

3. created/submitted an image journal(s) responding to text

 3,4, 5, and 6

 

            Mid-Level (Class Assessment): Students will be assessed on their ability to apply literary terms and facts about works of literature; to analyze, to criticize, and to evaluate works of literature in a number of ways; and to respond to questions about literature, especially in realms of synthesis and evaluation. 

 

            Exit Assessment: Students will be assessed on their ability to apply literary terms and facts about works of literature; to analyze, to criticize, and to evaluate works of literature in a number of ways; and to respond to questions about literature, especially in realms of synthesis and evaluation. 

 

 


 

Assignment Directions

 

Research Essay: Before beginning the research paper, read the sections in the Guide to College Writing on "The Research Paper" and “Writing about Literature.”

 

 The length for this paper is five to seven pages of text, typed. (You will include a Works Cited page that is part of the paper but is not a page of text.)

 Decide on a short story, play, novel, film or poem from this class. You may choose more than one selection but not more than three. Do research on the selection(s). Decide on the limited topic you intend to handle and on which you can find sufficient resource material. Do NOT do a biography of an author.

 You should use five or more sources in the paper, three of which must be print sources, one of which must be an Internet or other electronic source. (General encyclopedias are not appropriate sources.) Be sure that you include not only paraphrased but also quoted material. Use MLA‑format documentation. For each paper, submit, in addition to the paper, copies of the sources you used, with the information you used highlighted. You will not receive credit for the submitted paper unless you have furnished highlighted copies of source material.

We will not be studying the research paper or how to write one. Make sure you read the noted sections in the Guide to College Writing. You will be graded on the conventions of essay writing, documentation, etc.

 

 

Reflective Essay

 

The length for this paper is five to seven pages of text, typed.

 Decide on a short story, play, novel, film or poem from this class in which you are interested. You may choose more than one selection but not more than three. Discuss this work or these works in terms of your personal reaction/relationship to the work or works.

 

Creative Journal

Choose a piece of literature or a theme running through a series of texts or one piece of literature. Using the selection(s) as a basis, develop the equivalent of a ten-page journal that is visual, tactile, imagistic. The purpose of this journal is to illuminate the work(s) for other class members. You will be asked

1) why you choose the work(s) you choose,

(2) how you think your project illuminates/explicates the work(s) you choose,

3) the significance of each element of your project.

You must label the project with the title of the work(s) you are dealing with. In addition to the project itself, you will also submit a page that contains your name, the name and a one-paragraph description of the project, and the name of the work(s) you have dealt with. Be creative. Take chances. ENJOY THIS (yes, that's part of the assignment—and required!). Don't worry; we'll look at some examples. You won't die from this.

 

 

 

You will also be taking two tests, which will be essay and comprehensive.

 


 

Grading

 

Grade Composition: Grades will be based on the following:

         Research essay                                             100 points                  

         Reflective essay                                             100 points

         Creative Journal          100 points each          200 points

         Tests                           100 points each          200 points

                                                                                 600 points

 

You must complete all assigned work to receive credit for the class.

 

Grading Scale and Academic Profiles: The Communications and Fine Arts Division has adopted a standard grading scale:

         90-100%  A     80-  89%  B     70-79%   C      60-69%   D      59% and below   F

 

Papers will be graded on structure, grammar, spelling, punctuation, and logic as well as content.  Content cannot make up for technique, nor can technique make up for content.

 

If you wish, you can revise and rewrite any paper (up to the last two weeks of the semester).  If the paper is acceptable (if you have made the corrections, followed the guidelines and suggestions for revision noted on the paper, and turned the paper in within one week), you will receive a 10% higher grade.

 

Standards of  Achievement: All student work will be held to the following academic criteria.


 

Accuracy of information

Organization and clarity of thoughts

Depth of critical thinking and observation

Satisfaction of requirements (deadlines, etc.)

Acceptable writing mechanics

Fidelity of work (no plagiarism, cheating, etc.)

Evidence of creative or innovative thinking

Effective cooperative learning


 

 

NOTICE:  If you make one of the mistakes listed in the Guide to College Writing as "mistakes NEVER to make," you will lose 10 points.  DON'T MAKE THESE MISTAKES! 

 

 

You need to keep track of your grades and not ask "How am I doing?" or "What is my average?"  Do not expect to call and ask about a grade.  Grades will not be posted.  If you want your final grade earlier than it is sent to you by the Registrar’s office, you can give me a stamped, self-addressed envelope and I will send it to you.

 

Academic Descriptions

Grade

Descriptor

Description

A

Excellent

Students receiving an “A” can be considered to have exhibited extraordinary effort in class and scholarship exceeding the expectations of the instructor and to have exhibited most or all of the following: to have participated regularly and on time (missed fewer than the equivalent to one week of classes); to have participated fully in peer evaluations and in discussions, revealing personal initiative in both; to have used well-supported and well-structured logical arguments in essay writing; to have revealed a grasp of mechanics that prevents errors; to have revealed depth of critical thought and observation; to have exhibited timeliness in turning in assignments; to have revealed strong interest in intellectual, cultural, and personal growth by reading and discussing assigned material; to have shown consistent improvement in academics.

B

Above Average

Students receiving a “B” can be considered to have exhibited above-average effort in class, revealing noticeable improvement in academics, and showing accurate and complete scholarship. The student will have exhibited most or all of the following: have participated regularly (not missed more than the equivalent of one week of classes) and on time; have participated honestly and solidly in peer evaluations and in class discussion; have used supported and structured logical arguments in essay writing; have revealed a grasp of mechanics that prevents many errors; have revealed critical thought and observation; have exhibited a moderate grasp of timeliness in turning in assignments; have revealed interest in intellectual, cultural, and personal growth by reading and discussing assigned material.

C

Average

Students receiving a “C” can be considered to have exhibited average effort in class, performing satisfactorily but not above average, with some self-direction, and have shown signs of academic progress, meeting assignment parameters accurately. The student will have exhibited most or all of the following: participated regularly (not missed more than the equivalent of one week of classes) and on time; participated willingly in peer evaluations and in class discussion; have used supported and structured arguments in essay writing; have revealed an average grasp of mechanics that prevents most errors; have revealed average critical thought and observation; have exhibited a moderate grasp of timeliness in turning in assignments; have revealed average interest in intellectual, cultural, and personal growth by reading and discussing assigned material.

D

Below Average

Students receiving a “D” can be considered to have exhibited some effort in class, but not enough to show fully engagement with the subject and with the course material, showing little or no initiative and academic improvement, and not meeting the scholarship requirements of assignments. The student will have exhibited most or all of the following: have participated somewhat in peer evaluations and in class discussion; have participated sporadically (have missed fewer than the equivalent of two weeks of classes) and usually on time; have used some structured and supported arguments in essay writing; have revealed a sub-standard grasp of mechanics that prevents only some errors; have revealed below average critical thought and observation; have exhibited some grasp of timeliness in turning in assignments; have revealed below average interest in intellectual, cultural, and personal growth by reading and discussing assigned material; have not met the scholarship requirements of assignments; have not shown initiative; have not revealed academic improvement.

F

Unsatisfactory

Students receiving an “F” can be considered to have exhibited little or no desire to pass the course. This will usually involve poor participation (missed more than the equivalent of two weeks of classes) and little or no effort to attempt improvement as well as scholarship deficiencies and lack of effort to complete assignments.

 

Sample Essays: The Guide to College Writing includes essays in an appendix. Each of these essays is the equivalent of an “A” or “B“ essay, generally in a freshman class.

 

Academic Integrity: Plagiarism is one type of academic dishonesty.  Plagiarism is representing someone else's ideas or work as your own.  To avoid plagiarism, when you use someone else's data, arguments, designs, words, ideas, project, etc., you must make it clear that the work originated with someone else by citing the source. Review The Guide to College Writing for documentation conventions. Also review the Student Code of Responsibilities and Conduct published by Rogers State University for a full discussion of “Code of Academic Conduct” and plagiarism penalties.

 

Americans with Disabilities Act

Rogers State University is committed to providing students with disabilities equal access to educational programs and services.  Before any educational accommodation can be provided, any student who has a disability that he or she believes will require some form of accommodation must do the following:  1) inform the professor of each class of such need; and 2) register for services to determine eligibility for assistance with the Office of Student Affairs, located in the Student Union. Students needing more information about Student Disability Services should contact: Jan Smith-Clayton, Director of Student Development, Office of Student Affairs, Rogers State University, 918-343-7579.

 

Computer Writing Labs: Computers are available in the University Preparatory Academy, Thunderbird Library, and Student Support Services, and in BH 205.

 


 

Class Conventions

 

Communication Protocol: You may not submit electronic documents. You may ask limited questions by email.  Please make sure you label the subject of any email clearly in the subject line of the email.

 

Attendance Policy: Attendance is vital. You cannot discuss if you are not here. Excessive absences (more than three—the equivalent of one week of class) will affect your grade. Please tell me if you come in late; otherwise you will be marked absent. If you are more than 10 minutes late, you will not receive credit for attendance for that class meeting.

 

Extra Credit and Late Work: No extra credit will be offered. Late work will lose 10% per day. No late work will be accepted more than two weeks after the initial submission date.

 

 

Expectations

 

·         Come to class prepared, having read the material to be discussed, ready to discuss and participate, bringing appropriate supplies, such as texts, paper, pen, etc.

 

·         If you have a paper due, come to class with your paper assembled and stapled for submission. All assignments should be properly assembled to hand in at the beginning of the class period in which they are due. Bring the assignments assembled and stapled, completely ready to submit. Do not expect time to finish or to assemble or to staple assignments during class. Assignments turned in more than five minutes after the beginning of the class period are late.

 

·         Assignments should be typed.  Other assignments should be typed or written on the front of loose-leaf notebook paper in ink. (Spiral notebook paper is always unacceptable.)

 

·         Please do not use ANY tobacco products in the classroom; do not wear hats or caps. 

 

·         Do not bring pagers or cell phones with audible notifications into the classroom.

 

·         Failure to comply with these requests will be seen as denoting lack of respect for the class, the instructor, and your classmates.

 

 

Closure Statement: The schedule and procedures in this course are subject to change in the event of extenuating circumstances.

 


 

Schedule and Text Assignments

 

Each assignment should be done by the first day of the class week.

 

Lesson/Subject                                                                                                              Date

 

Week

Assignment

Due Date

   1 Introduction and Frankenstein

Aug. 16

Frankenstein

 

   2 Frankenstein/Criticism

Aug. 23

Criticism/Frankenstein Criticism

Buffy the Vampire Slayer: “Hush,” “The Freshman,” “Pangs,” “Good-bye, Iowa.” Scene 3

 

   3 Criticism/Buffy

Aug. 30

Trickster Tales, Thurber, Kipling

 

   4 Trickster Tales/Thurber/Kipling

Sept. 6

Into the Woods

 

   5 Into the Woods

Sept. 13

The Tempest

Prepare research/analysis paper

 

   6 The Tempest

Sept. 20

The Tempest

Research/Literary Analysis 2 due

Sept. 27

   7 The Tempest     

Sept. 27

Caliban’s Hour

 

   8 The Left Hand of Darkness

Oct. 4

Prepare for Mid-Term

 

   9 Mid Term

Oct. 11

Faulkner (“Spotted Horses,” “The Bear”), Garcia Marquez “Very Old Man. . .), Chopin (“Story of an Hour,” “Desiree’s Baby”), LeGuin (“Ones Who Walk. . .”)

HeartLand selections

Oct. 11

 10 Faulkner, Garcia Marquez, Chopin, Perkins, LeGuin

Oct. 23

Kellerman

Prepare reflective paper

 

11 Savage Spawn

Oct. 30

Dostoevski

Reflective Paper due

Nov. 6

12 The Brothers Karamazov

Nov. 6

Dostoevski

 

 

13 The Brothers Karamazov

Nov. 13

Burgess

Prepare creative journal

 

14 Burgess

Creative journal

Nov. 20

Creative journal due

Nov. 27

15 Clockwork Orange (film)

Nov. 27

Final Essay due

Dec. 4

16 Final

Dec. 10

You must have a ticket to enter the final.

Dec.11

 

 

 

 

Ticket to the Final

 

 

Bring, as a ticket to the final, to the final a one-page, typed, no name attached, evaluation of the class. Tell what you liked and dislike about the class, what you think should be added, deleted, or changed. Make any suggestions you might have. Remember, if you don’t make suggestions, future students cannot benefit from your insight and experience. I will not see these evaluations until after the grades go to the Registrar’s office.


 

An Open Letter to Students

 

            Attending college is analogous to being employed. Success on the job is achieved only with hard work and effort. This is also true of college.

            Your employer expects you to be on the job every day, on time, and prepared to work. You are allowed only a specific number of sick days each year after which your pay is “docked.” This is also true in classes. Regular and prompt attendance/participation is essential.

            Meetings are an essential part of the workplace culture, and everyone is expected to attend regularly and to contribute to the discussion. If you miss an excessive number of meetings and/or do not share information, your employment success is in jeopardy. The same holds true for this class. You are not only expected to attend all of our on-line “meetings,” but you are expected to contribute to the discussion. This requires that you come prepared to discuss the assigned material. Failure to do so will put your success in jeopardy.

            Your employer requires you to submit all reports on time. Failure to do so will endanger your employer’s business and your success. The same is true for this class. All “reports” (papers, etc.) are due at the scheduled time (see syllabus). If, for a justified reason, you will not be able to meet the time schedule, you must notify me, just as you would contact your employer if you needed an extension. However, as in the workplace, such extensions do not come without a cost. Extensions result in a decrease in your “salary” (grade).

            Performance reviews occur periodically in the workplace, and your employer determines the degree of your success during these reviews. Such is the case in this class. The “performance reviews” for this class are papers and other assignments. These reviews require you to show not only your knowledge of the material, but also your ability to use this knowledge. Your “pay” (grade) depends on the quality of your performance.

            If you attend class regularly, participate in class discussions, and submit all materials, well prepared and in a timely fashion, you have the potential to excel in this class. I am looking forward to working with you and to learning with you. I am always available if you need assistance.

Good luck! Good writing!

 

adapted, with permission, from Bremer, Joyce C. “The Responsible Student.” Innovation Abstracts 20.17 (4 Sep. 1998): 1.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Name(s): _______________________                              Name of work:  _________________________                                                                                       Author of work: _________________________

Genre of work:  _________________________

 

Plot

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Conflict(s)

Flashback(s)

Foreshadowing

Epiphany

Resolution

 

Climax

Denouement

Character(s)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Characterization: Flat/Round

Style

Tone

Allusion(s)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paradoxes

Point of View

Noteworthy Language

Setting

Image(s)

Symbol(s)

Theme(s)

Evaluation:

affective

mimetic

aesthetic

significance

integrity and originality

 

Interpretation:

literal

biographical

historical

sociological

psychological

religious

Personal Reaction

               

 


 

TYPES OF LITERARY EVALUATION

        Literary works may be evaluated in a number of ways. You may choose to evaluate in any manner you wish. However, if you are feeling insecure about evaluation and if you wish some concrete guidelines, the following list of terms may serve as an aid.

        Affective

                        Affective evaluation is evaluation of emotional appeal.

                       Does the work emotionally involve you? Were you excited and interested?

 

            Aesthetic       

Aesthetic evaluation is evaluation on artistic principles of complexity, unity, and economy.

                                   A work is simple when only a few of the possibilities of a situation are being dealt with. A work is complex when the author attempts to include or suggest many facets. A work is unified when all the parts contribute to the whole of the work. A work is economical when the writer says as much as possible in the fewest words.

 

Integrity and originality

 

           Evaluation of the integrity and originality of the author is based on the judgment of whether the author is using trite ideas and formula plots, etc., or if the author is using new and original ways to present ideas.

 

Mimetic

           Mimetic evaluation is evaluation of plausibility or verisimilitude.

                       Does the work seem as if it could have happened, given the parameters set up by the writer? Does the work seem to present the truth, given the parameters set up by the author? A fantasy may be plausible and "real" if the reader can accept it.

 

Significance

           Evaluation by significance is related to mimetic evaluation.

                       The work is judged on how significant, how penetration, how useful the statement about experience is. Is what the author says of any importance?

 


 

Study Questions

Literary Traditions

 

Frankenstein

 

If Frankenstein is related to any of the stories you have read for this class, how is it related? If it is not, how is it different?

 

Why is Frankenstein (subtitled The Modern Prometheus) subtitled? What is the relation of the subtitle to the novel?

 

Frankenstein is told in a series of letters. How would the story be different if the story were told by an omniscient narrator? Why do you think Shelley choose the point of view that she did?

 

Frankenstein is written by a female writer. Does the text have any strong female roles? Why do you think this is so?

 

Compare Walton and Frankenstein from Frankenstein.

 

In Frankestein, is your view of the creature changed when he tells his story? How does the telling of his story affect you?

 

Frankenstein was written and rewritten from 1815 to 1831, more than 150 years ago. How does Frankenstein reflect the concerns that a modern society must face?

 

What are the parallels between Frankenstein and his creation?

 

How relevant is Frankenstein’s creature’s appearance to his rejection? Does this rejection occur in today’s society as well as yesterday’s?

 

Even if you have never seen one of the Frankenstein films, you are familiar with the pop culture representation of the creature. The creature even appears in TV’s repeated reruns of The Munsters, as well as in cartoons and on greeting cards. Why do you think filmmakers—and subsequently other pop culture media—changed the creature’s person and personality?

 

Compare the creature of Frankenstein films and the novel. Which creature is most sympathetic? If you think Mary’s Shelly’s creature is more sympathetic, why do you think that is so?

 

 

Fairy Tales

 

What are the common elements in the all of the following: creation stories, the trickster tales, and the modern “fairy tales” that you have read for this class, as well as the other fairy tales, etc., with which you are familiar? Pay attention to the patterns of these tales as well as the thematic and structural elements.

 

What are the definitions of the following terms: fairy tale, myth, and fable? What are the distinctions between these forms of storytelling?

 

What are the common themes that run through the creation stories, the trickster tales, and the modern “fairy tales” that you have read for this class, as well as the other fairy tales, etc., with which you are familiar?

 

How do cultures differ on gender and age issues in the fairy tales, myths, and stories that you have read for this class? To what do you ascribe the differences?

 

Compare the original “fairy tales” and the “modern fairy tales” we have read for this class.

 

Use a form of literary criticism to comment on two of the fairy/trickster tales we have read for this class to this point.

 

 

Buffy

 

What theme(s) do you see in “The Freshman”? What other works have you seen such a theme(s) in? How are the themes you have discovered universal (relevant to more than one culture, more than one era, more than one work?)

 

In “The Freshman” one sees the beginning of one girl’s college career. How does the plot resemble what you know of beginning college life?

 

What theme(s) do you see in “Hush”? What other works have you seen such a theme(s) in? How are the themes you have discovered universal (relevant to more than one culture, more than one era, more than one work?)

 

In “Hush” we see myth told and revisited in “real life.” How does this resemble myth and life in other works or in your life or the life of others you know?

 

What theme(s) do you see in “Pangs”? What other works have you seen such a theme(s) in? How are the themes you have discovered universal (relevant to more than one culture, more than one era, more than one work?)

 

What does Scene 3 in “Goodbye, Iowa” reveal to us about the currency of Frankenstein and Frankensteinian imagery in contemporary works.

 

How do the themes in each of the episodes relate to Frankenstein? How does the television episode use the story of Frankenstein and the creature to build on and amend the story to resonate in a series such as Buffy?

 

Compare the themes in the three episodes you saw. What similarities do you find? What differences? How relevant are the themes to themes in other works?

 

 

Into the Woods

 

Discuss Into the Woods. What tales are represented in the musical and what tales are changed in the musical? Why?

 

What is the significance of gender in Into the Woods? Discuss.

What is the significance of setting in Into the Woods? Discuss.

Discuss initiation themes in Into the Woods.

Discuss the differentiation between “nice,” “good,” and “right” in Into the Woods.

Discuss the Freudian and Jungian implications of Into the Woods.

How does Act II of Into the Woods function to illuminate the different attitudes of modern society compared to attitudes of society when the fairy tales were first written down? How does Act II define “happily ever after”?

What are the themes and symbols in Into the Woods and how do they function together? How do the themes in the play resemble themes in other works of literature?

 

 

The Tempest

 

What function do the songs serve in The Tempest? What are the differences between the songs and how do those differences reflect the mood/theme of the scene in which they appear?

 

Discuss the role of magic, fantasy, and the supernatural in The Tempest.

 

Compare the Trinculo-Stephano-Caliban scenes in The Tempest with those involving Alonso-Sebastian-Antonio-Gonzalo. What parallels are there, and how are they different?

 

Is the masque paralleled by any other scenes in The Tempest? Why does Prospero interrupt it?

 

All of the characters in The Tempest refer to art versus "real life" at various points in this play. What is the role of art in this play's world?

 

What is the purpose of the conspiracy subplot in The Tempest? Explain.

 

Assess Prospero’s "farewell" to his powers in Act V of The Tempest. .

 

Talk about family structures in The Tempest. (Where are the mothers? Where are the wives? etc.) Look at Act I, Scene ii, lines 333-46. How does this speech reflect that inheritance through the mother is not valid, and that control rests in the ability to do ill?

 

Caliban is a good speaker in a world where good language means nobility of soul. What is the purpose of his linguistic ability? Discuss Caliban’s comment, "You taught me language, and my profit on’t / Is I know how to curse. The red plague rid you / For learning me your language!" (Shakespeare, The Tempest 1.2.362-364). Is he a Frankensteinian figure?

 

Look at the exchange between Miranda and Prospero in which he discusses their history. What is he anxious about and how does he address that anxiety?

 

Discuss at least three of the villains in The Tempest. What makes them villains? What are their characteristics?

 

What does the island in The Tempest represent? What is the significance of the setting?

 

What is the basis for ruling and being a ruler in The Tempest ?

 

What is the significance of the little game of chess in Act Five of The Tempest?

 

What does Gonzalo represent in The Tempest? Is he admirable? Look at his speeches. Does he have a good grasp of the situations?

 

What role do women play in The Tempest and how are they viewed by the characters? Assess the importance of sexuality and sexual energy in the play, especially in relation to gender.

 

What are the purposes of the masque and of the storm in the play, The Tempest?

 

Prospero controls much of our information about the events in his story in The Tempest. How does this affect our reading? Read Prospero’s speech in 1.2.107-116. What does the language tell us about his state of mind?

 

Compare the Trinculo-Stephano-Caliban scenes with those involving Alonso-Sebastian-Antonio-Gonzalo. What parallels are there, and how are they different?

 

 

The Left Hand of Darkness

 

What reflection of the world we know do you see in The Left Hand of Darkness? Do elements in the novel allow it to take readers into a new understanding of gender? If so, how? If not, why not?

 

In The Left Hand of Darkness, Genly Ai and Estraven come from radically different worlds and from radically different views of gender/sexuality and from radically different worldviews. What makes them able to relate to each other? to communicate?

 

In The Left Hand of Darkness, the YinYang symbol is shown and the following dialogue ensues:

“Do you know that sign?”

He looked at it for a long time with a strange look, but he said, “No.”

“It’s found on Earth. . . . It is yin and yang. Light is the left hand of darkness. . . how did it go? Light, dark. Fear, courage. Cold, warmth. Female, male. It is yourself, Therem. Both and one. A shadow on snow” (LeGuin 267).

Discuss this dialogue. What is the relation of the dialogue to the theme of the novel? to the society described in the novel? to the characters?

 

Why is the title of the novel The Left Hand of Darkness? Speculate on why darkness is the “left” hand.

 

In The Left Hand of Darkness why are women of Earth “more alien to me than you are” to Genly Ai?

 

There is tension between the value of the individual and the value of the individual as part of the group in The Left Hand of Darkness. Discuss this tension.

 

The Left Hand of Darkness discusses the effect of language. What conclusions do the characters draw about language? Are you in agreement about those conclusions?

 

The Tempest also has an emphasis on language. How does language drive the events in the play? How does language affect the characters? How does language affect the characterization of the characters?  Do The Left Hand of Darkness and The Tempest offer the same view of language?

 

The Left Hand of Darkness can be said to be about communication, which may or may not go beyond language itself. In what ways is the novel about communication? How are communication barriers between characters overcome? In what ways are communication barriers between characters not overcome?

 

The Left Hand of Darkness asks what the differences are between men and women. What does the novel answer? What is your answer?

 

Would a female Envoy have reacted differently from the male Envoy? How do you know? Why or why not?

 

How are various philosophies such as Tao and Martin Buber’s dissertation in I and Thou reflected in The Left Hand of Darkness?

 

If it is, in what ways is The Left Hand of Darkness critical of contemporary society? If it is not, how is it not?

 

Does reading The Left Hand of Darkness or any other novel change the way you think or the way you perceive things? Why or why not?

 

Although The Left Hand of Darkness is about a journey into space, it is also about a journey into self and into the unconscious. Discuss this concept.

 

How does the form of narration drive the events and themes of The Left Hand of Darkness?

 

How do each of the myths narrated in The Left Hand of Darkness become part of the events of the novel?

 

The Left Hand of Darkness has been called a “hero’s journey,” reflective of the hero’s journey of various myths. Who is the “hero”? What is the journey? Are there multiple “heroes”?

 

In The Left Hand of Darkness, we find that “the king is pregnant.” How do you react to this statement.

 

How is the creation myth of The Left Hand of Darkness like the creation stories of various groups on Earth?

 

Do you find the ending of The Left Hand of Darkness believable? Why or why not?

 

What other works have we read that might be compared with validity to The Left Hand of Darkness? How would you evaluate The Left Hand of Darkness in relation to other works we have read for this class?

 

What forms of literary criticism might be especially applicable to use in relation to The Left Hand of Darkness?

 

Short Stories

 

What elements of realism and of magical realism, if any, appear in the short stories?

 

In “The Bear,” what role does Faulkner see for tradition? for progress? Is the past significant for “today”?

 

In “The Bear,” what is the role Faulkner assigns to the natural world? How does the natural world affect people?

 

What is the role of Sam Fathers in “The Bear”? What is he both symbolic of and evocative of?

 

What is the significance of the bear in “The Bear”? What is the significance of the bear to the boy?

 

In “The Bear” why must the young boy relinquish his gun, watch, compass, and stick as he moves into the woods to meet the bear? What various symbolic meanings might these possess?

 

In “The Bear,” what is the boy’s relationship to his two “fathers”: to Sam and to his biological father?

 

In “The Bear,” what does the boy learn in this story in addition to hunting?

 

How does the Keats’ quote from the young boy’s father and the two paragraphs that follow this quote relate to “The Bear” in its entirety?

 

Discuss gender roles in “Spotted Horses.”

 

The editor at Scribner's (original publisher) described “Spotted Horses” as "a tall tale with implications of tragedy." What are these implications?

 

How does humor play a role in “Spotted Horses”?

 

What is the importance of the title of “The Very Old Man with Enormous Wings”? What does it tell us about the story's central thematic concerns?

 

In “The Very Old Man with Enormous Wings,” what is the old man symbolic of? What function does he serve in the story?

 

What role does humor play in “The Very Old Man with Enormous Wings”?

 

Analyze “The Very Old Man with Enormous Wings”. What are the themes? the symbols? the images? the literary language elements? etc.

 

What is the importance of the title of “The Handsomest Drowned Man in the World”? What does it tell us about the story's central thematic concerns?

 

In “The Handsomest Drowned Man in the World” why were the villages so affected by the drowned man? How did perspective affect the way the drowned man was viewed?

 

Discuss gender roles in “The Handsomest Drowned Man in the World”.

 

What role does humor play in “The Handsomest Drowned Man in the World”?

 

Analyze “The Handsomest Drowned Man in the World”. What are the themes? the symbols? the images? the literary language elements? etc.

 

In “The Yellow Wallpaper,” what is the symbolic significance of the bed, the bars, the wallpaper, the garden, the room, her notebooks, the woman?

How does the gender of the narrator change the perspective of any of the short stories?

 

How does irony build in “The Story of an Hour,” “The Yellow Wallpaper,” “Desiree’s Baby,” “The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas”?

 

What is the philosophical basis for “The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas”?

 

What is the cultural basis for “The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas,” “Desiree’s Baby,” “The Story of and Hour,” “The Yellow Wallpaper”?

 

 

Essays
 

What is the structure of each of the essays you have read? Consider thesis, main points, evidence, sources, conclusion, etc.  Would addition or deletion of sources be helpful?

 

What literary elements occur in each of the essays you read? Consider alliteration, tone, style, etc.

 

What relevance do the essays you read have to the fiction works we have read for this class? How does the information in the essays relate to the occurrences or statements in the works of fiction we have read in this class?


 
Kellerman

 

What is the structure of Kellerman’s monograph? Consider thesis, main points, evidence, sources, conclusion, etc. 

 

What literary elements occur in Kellerman’s non-fiction monograph, Savage Spawn? Consider alliteration, tone, style, etc.

 

What relevance does Savage Spawn: Reflections on Violent Children have to the fiction works we have read for this class? How does the information in the essay relate to the occurrences or statements in the works of fiction we have read in this class?

 

 

 

The Brothers Karamazov

 

What does Dostoevsky say about living in a society based on the suffering of others? Do you understand Ivan’s argument? Do you understand Alyosha’s answer? Do you agree with either of them? Why or why not?

 

What is the basic conflict in the novel, The Brothers Karamazov? The obvious answer is the conflicts between the father and brothers, the brothers, Dmitri and society, etc. However there are also philosophical conflicts; one is between faith and doubt. How is this conflict exemplified?

 

What does each of the brothers represent, as stated by Dostoevsky? What role does each play in the novel?

 

The reader is supposed to at least suspect that Dmitri is the murderer. Why? Why would Dostoevsky have wanted that suspense? Is this a literary or philosophical conflict or both? Why?

 

Ivan and Fyodor have similar philosophies but Ivan disapproves of Fyodor. What does this say about Ivan’s beliefs?

 

Compare Ivan’s and Zosima’s beliefs. How are they representative of the novel’s philosophical questions and conflicts? How is Zosima’s belief system connected to Alyosha’s?

 

The novel contains the idea of moral legacies, the idea that moral teachings can be passed down from one person to the next. Zosima passes his beliefs to Alyosha. Does Alyosha pass his beliefs and/or teachings to anyone? Who? Why? How?

 

How did Dostoevsky use pain and anguish to explore the human condition? What would make his novels particularly appealing to the middle class and workers?

 

The novel presents the case for forgiveness and redemption. How does it do so? What is Zosima’s role in this case? What is the role of responsibility and causation?

 

Discuss the section titled “The Grand Inquisitor” in The Brothers Karamazov. What does the section say about free will, God, salvation, society, human nature? 

 

What role does self-knowledge play in The Brothers Karamazov? How does one obtain self-knowledge? What role does suffering play in self-knowledge? What is the relation of self-knowledge and redemption?

 

What is the role of ambiguity in The Brothers Karamazov? How does ambiguity call Ivan’s rationalism into question?

 

In The Brothers Karamazov, compare Grushenka, Katerina, and Lise. Is each one redeemed? Is so, how and why? If not, why not? How is the role of each different because of gender?

 

What is the function of the Illyusha section in the novel The Brothers Karamazov? What do the schoolboys, the father, Kostya, the family, the stone throwing, the dog represent?

 

In The Brothers Karamazov, what is the justification for murder, according to Smerdyakov? How is this related to a philosophical stance?

 

Define moral responsibility in terms of The Brothers Karamazov .

 

Discuss the role of Gregory and his wife, Ratikin, and Mrs. Khokhlakov in The Brothers Karamazov

 

What is the role of the court and of the justice system in The Brothers Karamazov?

 

In The Brothers Karamazov, why is there expectation of miracle on Zosima’s death? What is the reaction to the lack of miracle? What is the symbolism of death and lack of miracle? How does the corpse represent the lack of validation of religious faith?

 

What does it mean that Christ kissed the Grand Inquisitor? What does it mean that Zosima bows to Dmitri? What are these gestures symbolic of?

 

Using Marxist, existential, humanist, gender, social criticism, etc., criticize The Brothers Karamazov

 

Discuss the argument that “without God, all things are possible.”

 

Dostoevsky presents a compelling case against belief in God. Faith is a risk and it defies logic. He presents, for example, “The Grand Inquisitor,” in which a case is made for strong leadership and lack of individual decision. What is the function of the Inquisitor section? How does Dostoevsky answer the Inquisitor?

 

Dostoevsky has his characters deal with the problem of free will and shows that every person must exercise will. Is it a curse or a blessing? How does the novel deal with free will and its results?

 

Discuss “The Grand Inquisitor.” What is the role of this “poem” in the novel? How does this story relate to events in society today? How does this story relate to events that you have participated in or know of? What does the Inquisitor represent? Does the Inquisitor or Christ represent Dostoevsky’s philosophy? If so, how? 

 

How are the themes and occurrences in The Brothers Karamazov related to themes and occurrences in other works we have read for this class?

 

 


 

A Clockwork Orange: Novel

 

Discuss A Clockwork Orange. What does the novel say about free will, God, salvation, society, human nature, values?

 

Discuss the ethical questions in A Clockwork Orange voiced by the prison chaplain: “What does God want? Does God want goodness or the choice of goodness? Is a man who chooses the bad perhaps in some way better than a man who has the good imposed upon him?"

 

Again, in A Clockwork Orange, the prison chaplain says, after Alex is “treated,” “He has no real choice [to be good or bad], has he? Self-interest, fear of physical pain, drove him to that grotesque act of self-abasement. Its insincerity was clearly to be seen. He ceases to be a wrongdoer. He ceases also to be a creature of moral choice.” Discuss.

 

How is free will a central theme in A Clockwork Orange? What are the discussions, investigations, and perturbations related to free will in the novel? What conclusion does the novel come to in terms of free will?

 

What are the structural elements in A Clockwork Orange? How does Part III mirror and reverse Part I? What are the functions of the mirrored and reversed elements?

 

How are musical elements related to the structure and the language in A Clockwork Orange?

 

What does A Clockwork Orange say about social norms and mores?

 

How is A Clockwork Orange a moral parable? What is the moral?

 

What is the meaning of a clockwork orange? Why does Burgess chose this as the title and central symbol in the work?

 

How does Alex have free will in Part I? How does he NOT have free will in Part I? Does he have free will in Part III?

 

What causes Alex to become different at the end of the novel A Clockwork Orange? Is it simply growing up? What are the roots of change in him?

 

What role does music play in the novel A Clockwork Orange? Is music “celestial”? Is it redemptive? Can beauty be corrupted to bad ends?

 

Why does Burgess choose to use the artificial language in the novel A Clockwork Orange? What effect does it have on the reader?

 

What kind of relationship do Alex and his parents have in A Clockwork Orange? Could you anticipate that he would have a different kind of relationship with his children than his parents have with him? Why or why not?

 

How does Alex justify his “decision” to choose to do evil in A Clockwork Orange? Follow his reasoning and decide if the reasoning is valid. If it is not, why not? If it is, how is it?

 

 


 

A Clockwork Orange: Film

 

What is the relation of the film A Clockwork Orange to occurrences or trends in society in the last half of the Twentieth Century?

 

Is the effect of the film A Clockwork Orange different from the effect of the novel A Clockwork Orange? If it is, how is it different? How does the film achieve the effect it does?

 

The film A Clockwork Orange does not include information or events based on the last chapter of the British version or the latest American version of the novel A Clockwork Orange. (You have read the latest American version.) Does this strengthen or weaken the film? Which version is more realistic? Which is more affective (related to feeling)? Which is more effective (which “works” best)?

 

Does music have a different function in the film A Clockwork Orange than it does in the novel A Clockwork Orange? Explain.

 

How do the settings in the film A Clockwork Orange affect your reaction to the events? How does the fact the characters appear before you on the screen affect how you relate to the events?

 

Synthesis

 

What are the common themes running through two or more of the works studied this semester?

 

What are the elements common to two or more works studied this semester?

 

What would Kellerman say about the themes in A Clockwork Orange?

 

How are mythic/fable elements present in each of the works studied this semester?

 

How does reading each work build on the knowledge and information you gain from reading each the previous works? How does the class become a cumulative experience?

 

Considering that you have limited experience and based on the limited experience that you have had in reading works for this class, what can you conclude about literary traditions in the U.S. and in the world?

 

What have you learned from the class as a whole?

 

What are the realistic elements present in each of the works studied this semester?

 

How does language color how we react to what we hear and see? (Consider language use and patterns. What do phrases like “once upon a time” and “long ago in a kingdom far away” signal? How? How does language illuminate the points of view in The Tempest and Caliban’s Hour? How does language decrease the shock elements in A Clockwork Orange?)

 

Each of the works studied in this class deals with the idea of free will in some manner. What does each work say about free will and determinism? Group the works into classes of ideas and discuss them in terms of the works.

 

People have a tendency to make events and lives into “stories.” How does each work studied in this class do this?

 

What function do different linguistic perspectives reveal in each of the works studied? Using several of the works, discuss how language “informs” the work and the reader.

 

 

RSU Communications and Fine Arts Definition of Plagiarism

The RSU Student Code defines plagiarism as “presenting the work of another as one’s own (i.e., without proper acknowledgment of the source or sources), or submitting material that is not entirely one’s own work without attributing the unoriginal portions to their correct sources. The sole exception to the requirement of acknowledging sources occurs when ideas or information are common knowledge” (see Title 12 in the Student Code, available online at www.rsu.edu/scode).

Integrating the words and ideas of others into your own work is an important feature of academic expression.  But plagiarism occurs whenever we incorporate the intellectual property of others into our own work without proper acknowledgement of whose words, ideas, or other original material we are bringing into our work, either with quotation marks and direct mention of the source or through other means of clear and precise acknowledgement. 

Plagiarism can of course be a purely intentional attempt at deceit, but whether or not there is conscious intent to deceive, plagiarism occurs any time you do not give proper acknowledgement of others’ contributions to your work.  Ignorance of the responsibility of acknowledging sources is not a legitimate defense against a charge of plagiarism, any more than not knowing the speed limit on a given road makes a person stopped for speeding less at fault.  Since the consequences of being charged with plagiarism are serious, the Communications and Fine Arts Department has adopted the following definition of plagiarism to ensure your more precise understanding of what constitutes plagiarism, intentional or unintentional. 

1. It is plagiarism to copy another’s words directly and present them as your own without quotation marks and direct indication of whose words you are copying.  All significant phrases, clauses, and passages copied from another source require quotation marks and proper acknowledgement, down to the page number(s) of printed texts.*

Source material from the “Notice” to Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: “Persons attempting to find a motive in this narrative will be prosecuted; persons attempting to find a moral in it will be banished; persons attempting to find a plot in it will be shot.”

Plagiarized: Surely it is an exaggeration to say that persons attempting to find a moral in Huckleberry Finn will be banished and persons attempting to find a plot in it will be shot.  

Proper acknowledgement of source: Perhaps the author is exaggerating when he says that “persons attempting to find a moral” in his novel “will be banished” and “persons attempting to find a plot in it will be shot” (Twain 3).

Note that even brief clauses and phrases copied from source material require quotation marks. Also note that acknowledging the source without putting the quoted words in quotation marks is still plagiarism: put all quoted words in quotation marks.

2. It is plagiarism to paraphrase another writer’s work by altering some words but communicating the same essential point(s) made by the original author without proper acknowledgment.  Though quotation marks are not needed with paraphrasing, you must still acknowledge the original source directly.

Source material from Adolph Hitler, by John Tolland: “Ignored by the West, the Soviet Union once more looked to Germany.  Early in 1939 it accepted a Hitler overture to discuss a new trade treaty by inviting one of Ribbentrop’s aides to Moscow; and a few days later Stalin gave credence to a sensational story in the London News Chronicle that he was signing a non-aggression pact with the Nazis” (721).

Plagiarized: When Western nations continued to shun the Soviet Union, the Russians drew closer to Germany, meeting with a senior Nazi official in Moscow to arrange a trade agreement in early 1939.  Shortly after, Stalin admitted his intent to sign a pact of non-aggression with Germany.

Proper acknowledgement of source: In Adolph Hitler, John Tolland notes that when Western nations continued to shun the Soviet Union, the Russians drew closer to Germany, meeting with a senior Nazi official in Moscow to arrange a trade agreement in early 1939.  Shortly after, Stalin admitted his intent to sign a pact of non-aggression with Germany (721).

3. Plagiarism includes presenting someone else’s ideas or factual discoveries as your own.  If you follow another person’s general outline or approach to a topic, presenting another’s original thinking or specific conclusions as your own, you must cite the source even if your work is in your own words entirely.  When you present another’s statistics, definitions, or statements of fact in your own work, you must also cite the source.

Example 1: Say that you read Paul Goodman’s “A Proposal to Abolish Grading,” in which he claims that an emphasis on grades results in students’ caring more about grades than learning subject matter, causing them to have a bad attitude when their grades are low and sometimes even leading them to cheating.  In order to make these same essential points in your own work without plagiarizing—even if your development of these ideas differs markedly from Goodman’s in examples and order of presentation—you must still acknowledge Goodman as the basis for your approach to the topic.

Plagiarized: Abolishing grades at the college level would allow students to focus on subject matter instead of grades, it would prevent students from getting a bad attitude towards a class when they receive low grades, and it would virtually eliminate the temptation to cheat or plagiarize.

Proper acknowledgement of source: As Paul Goodman argues in “A Proposal to Abolish Grading,” doing away with grades would allow students to focus on subject matter instead of grades, it would prevent students from getting a bad attitude towards a class when they receive low grades, and it would virtually eliminate the temptation to cheat or plagiarize.

Example 2: If you found a source indicating that Americans consume more beer on Friday than on any other day of the week, to make this claim in your work you must cite the source to avoid plagiarism.  If the source indicated that American beer-drinking on Fridays accounts for 21% of the whole week’s total consumption, mentioning this statistic, or even approximating it, requires acknowledgement of the source.

Plagiarized: Americans consume more beer on Fridays than on any other day of the week.
Proper acknowledgement of source: Americans consume more beer on Fridays than on any other day of the week
(Cox 31).

Plagiarized: Beer consumption on Fridays accounts for more than 20% of total U.S. consumption throughout the week.
Proper acknowledgement of source: Beer consumption on Fridays accounts for more than 20% of total U.S. consumption throughout the week (Cox 31).

4. Plagiarism includes allowing someone else to prepare work that you present as your own.

Allowing a friend, parent, tutor, or anyone else to compose any portion of work you present as your own is plagiarism.  Note that plagiarism includes copying, downloading, or purchasing an essay or any other material in part or in whole via the Internet.  Note also that plagiarism includes using online “translator programs” in foreign language classes.

5. Plagiarism applies in other media besides traditional written texts, including, but not limited to, oral presentations, graphs, charts, diagrams, artwork, video and audio compositions, and other electronic media such as web pages, PowerPoint presentations, and postings to online discussions.

Conclusion:

·         If you are uncertain about any portion or aspect of this definition of plagiarism, ask your instructor to clarify or explain immediately.  If at any point later in the semester you have questions about potential plagiarism issues, talk to your instructor about them before submitting the work in question.

·         Students who plagiarize often feel pressured into submitting plagiarized work because they have either struggled with the assignment or waited until the last minute to get the work under way.  You will always be better served discussing your situation with your instructor, however grim it seems, rather than submitting any work that is not entirely your own. 

*The examples of proper acknowledgement of sources above follow the MLA (Modern Language Association) conventions for in-text parenthetical citation used in English classes and many other courses in the humanities.  The parenthetical references point the reader to a list of “Works Cited” at the end of an essay.  Other courses and disciplines may follow different conventions, such as footnotes, endnotes, or a variety of other methods of documentation (APA, Chicago Style, etc.).


 

Student Contract for Literary Traditions

 

Read each statement carefully, sign, and submit this contract. This contract must be on file for you to remain enrolled in the class.

 

I have read and understood the guidelines and requirements in the syllabus.

 

I understand that this class is for three hours college credit; this implies three hours of class meeting.

 

I understand that each hour of college credit usually requires two or more hours per week study time outside of class. I understand that means I have a reading/study/research/writing commitment of six or more hours per week outside the three-hour participation requirement.

 

I understand that participation is required.

I understand that attendance is required.

I understand that this class involves deadlines.

I understand that peer critiquing may be required in this class; this means that any work I do for this class may be subject to peer review by my classmates.

 

I understand what plagiarism is, and I understand that strict penalties will incur if I plagiarize material.

 

I understand literary/academic/periodical selections for this class may contain controversial or “offensive” material; this is the nature of some works.

 

 

Name: ___________________________

Date:   ___________________________

Signature: ____________________________          

 

 

 


 

 

Course and section:___________________________  

CFA Plagiarism Definition Acknowledgement

I understand and accept the following definition of plagiarism:

1. It is plagiarism to copy another’s words directly and present them as your own without quotation marks and direct indication of whose words you are copying.  All significant phrases, clauses, and passages copied from another source require quotation marks and proper acknowledgement, down to the page number(s) of printed texts.

2. It is plagiarism to paraphrase another writer’s work by altering some words but communicating the same essential point(s) made by the original author without proper acknowledgment.  Though quotation marks are not needed with paraphrasing, you must still acknowledge the original source directly.

3. Plagiarism includes presenting someone else’s ideas or factual discoveries as your own.  If you follow another person’s general outline or approach to a topic, presenting another’s original thinking or specific conclusions as your own, you must cite the source even if your work is in your own words entirely.  When you present another’s statistics, definitions, or statements of fact in your own work, you must also cite the source.

4. Plagiarism includes allowing someone else to prepare work that you present as your own.

5. Plagiarism applies in other media besides traditional written texts, including, but not limited to, oral presentations, graphs, charts, diagrams, artwork, video and audio compositions, and other electronic media such as web pages, PowerPoint presentations, and postings to online discussions.

My signature below indicates that I have read and do understand and accept the “RSU Communications and Fine Arts Definition of Plagiarism,” which contains examples and explanation of the various types of plagiarism listed above. 

Print your name here:                                                 Sign your name here:
__________________________________            _________________________________   


 

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