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Dr. Dial-Driver

Syllabus for English Composition I 2007

Common Syllabus for English Composition I

 

            In order to insure consistent student outcomes in this course, this common syllabus is distributed to each student taking Composition I.

 

Course Description: A study of composition, with emphasis on writing effective, short essays; writing effective sentences; paragraph development; and correct usage. Students completing this course will exhibit competency—through testing, course work, portfolio, student/faculty interaction, and/or other appropriate measures—in written communications skills, reasoning skills, and critical thinking skills. Three hours credit.

 

Course Prerequisites: ACT score of 19 or equivalent OR grade of "C" or above in ENGL 1033 (Basic Writing)

 

Textbooks and Resources       

            Bradbury, Ray. Fahrenheit 451. New York: Ballatine, 1981.

            Dial-Driver, Emily. A Guide to College Writing. 6th ed., rev. Reno: BentTree Press, 2006.

            Glenn, Cheryl. Making Sense:  A New Rhetorical Reader. 2nd ed. New York: Bedford, 2005.

           

Library Materials: Materials relating to this course, including the textbooks, are on reserve in the RSU Library.

 

Learning Objectives

            In accordance with the Rogers State University mission and the mission of the Department of Communications and Fine Arts, Composition I leads to the following outcomes:

1.       Composition I is required for those students aspiring to baccalaureate degrees, associate degrees, and some certificate and associate of applied science programs.

2.       Composition I is designed to build and display effective communication skills and creative and critical thinking in an atmosphere of academic freedom which encourages interaction in a positive academic climate.

3.        This course is designed to create opportunities for cultural, intellectual, and personal enrichment for students.

By the end of the course, the student should be able to demonstrate ability to--

1.       write a well-developed, well-supported 400-1000 word expository essay, using formal essay structure, and containing a coherent thesis statement; with minimum of grammatical and mechanical errors;

2.       write a short researched essay/body section of essay, using one or more forms of

standard documentation, such as MLA, APA, etc.;

3.       evaluate and use library resources, including electronic and Internet source

            4.  summarize and evaluate an article;

            5.  use the writing process:  pre-writing, planning, organizing, drafting, revising, editing;

            6.  write well-developed and supported paragraph answers to essay test questions;

            7.  write a supported, logical short essay in 50 minutes (ACT/SAT style)

 

Assessment Tools

   By the end of the semester students will have

Assessment Tool

Student Outcome Measured

Objective Measured

(initial) completed pre-tests on essay structure, grammar, and writing

 

 

(exit) completed post-tests on essay structure and grammar

2

1, 2, 4, 5

written formal essays, each essay reflecting the writing process

1, 2, 3

1, 5

written research project(s), each reflecting the writing process

1, 2, 3

2, 3, 5

written answer(s) to essay test question(s)

1

7

written 50-minute essays

1

6

summarized and evaluated professional essay selections

1, 2, 3

4

 


 

Initial Assessment:       Composition I students will take an assessment of grammar and an assessment of rhetorical and documentation skills and produce a writing sample.  If the student has not completed assessment by the end of the second week of classes, then the student will be assessed a point penalty.

            Students who miss the assessment test given in class may schedule a make-up test but must still complete all assessment prior to the end of the second week of class.

            Initial assessment tests will not be part of student semester grades.

            Students who are determined by the instructor to need additional writing experience in order to be successful in Composition I and who refuse such advisement must sign the Refusal of Advisement form.

 

Mid-Level (Class Assessment): Students will be assessed on their knowledge of the writing process, on their ability to write formal essays, formal 50-minute essays, essay test question answers, documented essays, summaries, and evaluations.

 

Exit Assessment: Composition I students will take an exit assessment of grammar and an exit assessment of rhetorical and documentation skills. Post-tests should be considered as part of the semester grade.

 

Standards of  Achievement

            All student work will be held to the following academic criteria:

                        Accuracy of information

                        Organization and clarity of thoughts

                        Depth of critical thinking and observation

                        Satisfaction of defined requirements (deadlines, etc.)

                        Acceptable writing mechanics

                        Fidelity of work (no plagiarism, cheating, etc.)

                        Evidence of creative or innovative thinking

                        Effective cooperative learning

 

Grading Scale and Academic Profiles

The Department of Communications and Fine Arts Division has adopted a standard objective grading scale:

                       


 

90-100%  A

80-89%    B      

70-79% C

60-69% D

59% and below  F


 

 

Academic Profile

 

Descriptor

Description

A

Excellent

Students receiving an “A” can be considered to have exhibited extraordinary effort in class and scholarship exceeding the expectations of the instructor and to have exhibited most or all of the following: to have attended regularly and on time (missed fewer than the equivalent of one week of class meetings); to have participated fully in peer evaluations and in class discussion, revealing personal initiative in both; to have used well-supported and well-structured logical arguments in essay writing; to have revealed a grasp of mechanics that prevents errors; to have revealed depth of critical thought and observation; to have exhibited timeliness in turning in assignments; to have revealed strong interest in intellectual, cultural, and personal growth by reading and discussing assigned material; to have shown consistent improvement in academics.

B

Above Average

Students receiving a “B” can be considered to have exhibited above-average effort in class, revealing noticeable improvement in academics, and showing accurate and complete scholarship. The student will have exhibited most or all of the following: have attended regularly (not missed more than the equivalent of one week of class meetings) and on time; have participated honestly and solidly in peer evaluations and in class discussion; have used supported and structured logical arguments in essay writing; have revealed a grasp of mechanics that prevents many errors; have revealed critical thought and observation; have exhibited a moderate grasp of timeliness in turning in assignments; have revealed interest in intellectual, cultural, and personal growth by reading and discussing assigned material.

C

Average

Students receiving a “C” can be considered to have exhibited average effort in class, performing satisfactorily but not above average, with some self-direction, and have shown signs of academic progress, meeting assignment parameters accurately. The student will have exhibited most or all of the following: attended regularly (not missed more than the equivalent of one week of class meetings) and on time; participated willingly in peer evaluations and in class discussion; have used supported and structured arguments in essay writing; have revealed an average grasp of mechanics that prevents most errors; have revealed average critical thought and observation; have exhibited a moderate grasp of timeliness in turning in assignments; have revealed average interest in intellectual, cultural, and personal growth by reading and discussing assigned material.

D

Below Average

Students receiving a “D” can be considered to have exhibited some effort in class, but not enough to show fully engagement with the subject and with the course material, showing little or no initiative and academic improvement, and not meeting the scholarship requirements of assignments. The student will have exhibited most or all of the following: have participated somewhat in peer evaluations and in class discussion; have attended somewhat regularly (missed more than the equivalent of one week and less than the equivalent of two weeks) and usually on time; have used some structured and supported arguments in essay writing; have revealed a sub-standard grasp of mechanics that prevents only some errors; have revealed below average critical thought and observation; have exhibited some grasp of timeliness in turning in assignments; have revealed below average interest in intellectual, cultural, and personal growth by reading and discussing assigned material; have not met the scholarship requirements of assignments; have not shown initiative; have not revealed academic improvement.

F

Unsatisfactory

Students receiving an “F” can be considered to have exhibited little or no desire to pass the course. This will usually involve poor participation and attendance (missed more than the equivalent of two weeks of class meetings) and little or no effort to attempt improvement as well as scholarship deficiencies and lack of effort to complete assignments.

 

Sample Essays

The Guide to College Writing includes essays in an appendix. Each of these essays is the equivalent of an “A” or “A-“ essay.

 

Department of Communications and Fine Arts Policy on Plagiarism

            Plagiarism is a form of academic dishonesty.  Plagiarism is representing someone else's ideas or work as your own.  To avoid plagiarism, when you use someone else's data, arguments, designs, words, ideas, project, etc., you must make it clear that the work originated with someone else by citing the source. See the Guide to College Writing for a discussion of how to avoid plagiarism. Please review the Student Code of Responsibilities and Conduct published by Rogers State University for a full discussion of “Code of Academic Conduct” and plagiarism penalties.  The RSU web site has links to the “Code.” Students found plagiarizing are subject to penalties.

 

Americans with Disabilities Act

Rogers State University is committed to providing students with disabilities equal access to educational programs and services.  Before any educational accommodation can be provided, any student who has a disability that he or she believes will require some form of accommodation must do the following:  1) inform the professor of each class of such need; and 2) register for services to determine eligibility for assistance with the Office of Student Affairs, located in the Student Union. Students needing more information about Student Disability Services should contact: Director of Student Development, Office of Student Affairs, Rogers State University, 918-343-7579.

 

Computer Writing Labs

            Computers for student use are available in the UPA, Stratton Taylor Library, and Student Support Services. Computers are available for class use in BH 207.

 

Closure Statement

The schedule and procedures in this course are subject to change in the event of extenuating circumstances.

 

 An Open Letter to Students

 

            Attending college is analogous to being employed. Success on the job is achieved only with hard work and effort. This is also true of college.

            Your employer expects you to be on the job every day, on time, and prepared to work. You are allowed only a specific number of sick days each year after which your pay is “docked.” This is also true in composition classes. Regular and prompt attendance is essential.

            Meetings are an essential part of the workplace culture, and everyone is expected to attend regularly and to contribute to the discussion. If you miss an excessive number of meetings and/or do not share information, your employment success is in jeopardy. The same holds true for this class. You are not only expected to attend all of our “meetings,” but you are expected to contribute to the discussion. This requires that you come to each class prepared to discuss the assigned material. Failure to do so will put your success in jeopardy.

            Your employer requires you to submit all reports on time. Failure to do so will endanger your employer’s business and your success. The same is true for this class. All “reports” (papers, etc.) are due at the scheduled time (see syllabus). If, for a justified reason, you will not be able to meet the time schedule, you must notify me, just as you would contact your employer if you needed an extension. However, as in the workplace, such extensions do not come without a cost. Extensions result in a decrease in your “salary” (grade).

            Performance reviews occur periodically in the workplace, and your employer determines the degree of your success during these reviews. Such is the case in this class. The “performance reviews” for this class are papers and other assignments. These reviews require you to show not only your knowledge of the material, but also your ability to use this knowledge. Your “pay” (grade) depends on the quality of your performance.

            If you attend class regularly, participate in class discussions, and submit all materials, well prepared and in a timely fashion, you have the potential to excel in this class. I am looking forward to working with you and to learning with you. I am always available if you need assistance.

Good luck! Good writing!

 

adapted, with permission, from Bremer, Joyce C. “The Responsible Student.” Innovation Abstracts 20.17 (4 Sep. 1998): 1.

 

"       

 

Name:   ___________________________

Date:    ___________________________

 

 

Student Contract for Composition I

Initial each statement and turn this contract in. This contract must be on file for you to attend the class.

_____   I have read and understood the guidelines and requirements in the syllabus.

_____  I understand that this class is for three hours college credit; this implies three hours of class

meeting.

_____  I understand that each hour of college credit usually requires two or more hours per week study

time outside of class.

_____   I understand what plagiarism is, and I understand that strict penalties will incur if I plagiarize material.

_____   I understand that peer critiquing may be required in this class; this means that any work I do for this class may be subject to peer review by my classmates.

_____  I understand that attendance is required.

_____   I understand literary selections for this class may contain controversial or “offensive” material; this

is the nature of some academic works.

 

                                                                                                _____________________________        

(signature)


 

RSU Communications and Fine Arts Definition of Plagiarism

The RSU Student Code defines plagiarism as “presenting the work of another as one’s own (i.e., without proper acknowledgment of the source or sources), or submitting material that is not entirely one’s own work without attributing the unoriginal portions to their correct sources. The sole exception to the requirement of acknowledging sources occurs when ideas or information are common knowledge” (see Title 12 in the Student Code, available online at www.rsu.edu/scode).

Integrating the words and ideas of others into your own work is an important feature of academic expression.  But plagiarism occurs whenever we incorporate the intellectual property of others into our own work without proper acknowledgement of whose words, ideas, or other original material we are bringing into our work, either with quotation marks and direct mention of the source or through other means of clear and precise acknowledgement. 

Plagiarism can of course be a purely intentional attempt at deceit, but whether or not there is conscious intent to deceive, plagiarism occurs any time you do not give proper acknowledgement of others’ contributions to your work.  Ignorance of the responsibility of acknowledging sources is not a legitimate defense against a charge of plagiarism, any more than not knowing the speed limit on a given road makes a person stopped for speeding less at fault.  Since the consequences of being charged with plagiarism are serious, the Communications and Fine Arts Department has adopted the following definition of plagiarism to ensure your more precise understanding of what constitutes plagiarism, intentional or unintentional. 

1. It is plagiarism to copy another’s words directly and present them as your own without quotation marks and direct indication of whose words you are copying.  All significant phrases, clauses, and passages copied from another source require quotation marks and proper acknowledgement, down to the page number(s) of printed texts.*

Source material from the “Notice” to Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: “Persons attempting to find a motive in this narrative will be prosecuted; persons attempting to find a moral in it will be banished; persons attempting to find a plot in it will be shot.”

Plagiarized: Surely it is an exaggeration to say that persons attempting to find a moral in Huckleberry Finn will be banished and persons attempting to find a plot in it will be shot.  

Proper acknowledgement of source: Perhaps the author is exaggerating when he says that “persons attempting to find a moral” in his novel “will be banished” and “persons attempting to find a plot in it will be shot” (Twain 3).

Note that even brief clauses and phrases copied from source material require quotation marks. Also note that acknowledging the source without putting the quoted words in quotation marks is still plagiarism: put all quoted words in quotation marks.

2. It is plagiarism to paraphrase another writer’s work by altering some words but communicating the same essential point(s) made by the original author without proper acknowledgment.  Though quotation marks are not needed with paraphrasing, you must still acknowledge the original source directly.

Source material from Adolph Hitler, by John Tolland: “Ignored by the West, the Soviet Union once more looked to Germany.  Early in 1939 it accepted a Hitler overture to discuss a new trade treaty by inviting one of Ribbentrop’s aides to Moscow; and a few days later Stalin gave credence to a sensational story in the London News Chronicle that he was signing a non-aggression pact with the Nazis” (721).

Plagiarized: When Western nations continued to shun the Soviet Union, the Russians drew closer to Germany, meeting with a senior Nazi official in Moscow to arrange a trade agreement in early 1939.  Shortly after, Stalin admitted his intent to sign a pact of non-aggression with Germany.

Proper acknowledgement of source: In Adolph Hitler, John Tolland notes that when Western nations continued to shun the Soviet Union, the Russians drew closer to Germany, meeting with a senior Nazi official in Moscow to arrange a trade agreement in early 1939.  Shortly after, Stalin admitted his intent to sign a pact of non-aggression with Germany (721).

3. Plagiarism includes presenting someone else’s ideas or factual discoveries as your own.  If you follow another person’s general outline or approach to a topic, presenting another’s original thinking or specific conclusions as your own, you must cite the source even if your work is in your own words entirely.  When you present another’s statistics, definitions, or statements of fact in your own work, you must also cite the source.

Example 1: Say that you read Paul Goodman’s “A Proposal to Abolish Grading,” in which he claims that an emphasis on grades results in students’ caring more about grades than learning subject matter, causing them to have a bad attitude when their grades are low and sometimes even leading them to cheating.  In order to make these same essential points in your own work without plagiarizing—even if your development of these ideas differs markedly from Goodman’s in examples and order of presentation—you must still acknowledge Goodman as the basis for your approach to the topic.

Plagiarized: Abolishing grades at the college level would allow students to focus on subject matter instead of grades, it would prevent students from getting a bad attitude towards a class when they receive low grades, and it would virtually eliminate the temptation to cheat or plagiarize.

Proper acknowledgement of source: As Paul Goodman argues in “A Proposal to Abolish Grading,” doing away with grades would allow students to focus on subject matter instead of grades, it would prevent students from getting a bad attitude towards a class when they receive low grades, and it would virtually eliminate the temptation to cheat or plagiarize.

Example 2: If you found a source indicating that Americans consume more beer on Friday than on any other day of the week, to make this claim in your work you must cite the source to avoid plagiarism.  If the source indicated that American beer-drinking on Fridays accounts for 21% of the whole week’s total consumption, mentioning this statistic, or even approximating it, requires acknowledgement of the source.

Plagiarized: Americans consume more beer on Fridays than on any other day of the week.
Proper acknowledgement of source: Americans consume more beer on Fridays than on any other day of the week
(Cox 31).

Plagiarized: Beer consumption on Fridays accounts for more than 20% of total U.S. consumption throughout the week.
Proper acknowledgement of source: Beer consumption on Fridays accounts for more than 20% of total U.S. consumption throughout the week (Cox 31).

4. Plagiarism includes allowing someone else to prepare work that you present as your own.

Allowing a friend, parent, tutor, or anyone else to compose any portion of work you present as your own is plagiarism.  Note that plagiarism includes copying, downloading, or purchasing an essay or any other material in part or in whole via the Internet.  Note also that plagiarism includes using online “translator programs” in foreign language classes.

5. Plagiarism applies in other media besides traditional written texts, including, but not limited to, oral presentations, graphs, charts, diagrams, artwork, video and audio compositions, and other electronic media such as web pages, PowerPoint presentations, and postings to online discussions.

Conclusion:

·         If you are uncertain about any portion or aspect of this definition of plagiarism, ask your instructor to clarify or explain immediately.  If at any point later in the semester you have questions about potential plagiarism issues, talk to your instructor about them before submitting the work in question.

·         Students who plagiarize often feel pressured into submitting plagiarized work because they have either struggled with the assignment or waited until the last minute to get the work under way.  You will always be better served discussing your situation with your instructor, however grim it seems, rather than submitting any work that is not entirely your own. 

*The examples of proper acknowledgement of sources above follow the MLA (Modern Language Association) conventions for in-text parenthetical citation used in English classes and many other courses in the humanities.  The parenthetical references point the reader to a list of “Works Cited” at the end of an essay.  Other courses and disciplines may follow different conventions, such as footnotes, endnotes, or a variety of other methods of documentation (APA, Chicago Style, etc.).


 

ENGL 1113: Composition I

General Information

ZAP:1255

Section: 008

Time:

Place: BH 201

Instructor:  Dr. Dial-Driver

Office:  BH 201-A

Phone/Voice Mail:  343-7747

email: edial-driver@rsu.edu

           

My schedule is posted.  You may see me before or after class, make an appointment, or call.  If you call and do not reach me, please leave a voice mail message.  If you come by and I am out of the office, please leave a message on the message sheet.  It would be wise to make an appointment to be sure of catching me since I often attend meetings in another building or even off-campus.  I will help you any time you ask (and sometimes when you don't ask!).

             

Class Description

Course Introduction

            Composition I is the first course in composition. This course is designed to serve you in any writing endeavor in which you decide to participate and to aid you in preparation for writing papers in college classes. You will be working some in concert with your classmates in order to help each other succeed. This course is about writing—and writing well!

 

Materials         


 

                        Loose-leaf notebook paper

                       Blue/black pen

                        Paperback dictionary (optional)

             Printer paper

             Two-pocket folder for journal


 

 

Major areas of emphasis for Composition I will include

       I.     Writing about experience

II.        Special skills--essay exams, library skills, summaries, and reports

III.         Formal essays--structure, planning, development

 

Names and phone numbers of classmates:    

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­______________________________________                  ________________________________

______________________________________                  ________________________________

 

Teaching Methods and Evaluation Instruments

            Composition I includes some lecture, some discussion, and much writing practice. Your grade will be based on a variety of writing experiences, including essays, summaries and evaluations of professional essays, etc.    

            The minimum requirement to pass the course is to be able to write a coherent, logical essay on an assigned topic.  Basic skills are also necessary to pass. 

 

Attendance Policy

            Composition I includes some lecture elements, some discussion, and much practice work. 

            Our approach to all that we see, read, or discuss will center on its instructive or intellectual potential. Since literature and film, like other arts, have the power to amuse, challenge, and offend, it is possible you may be disturbed at various times during the semester by the material with which we deal. Many of the materials we will study in this course were written for adult audiences. Materials may contain sexual references, violence, and emotionally-charged material, as well as religious and cultural values that may differ from our own. If you wish to ensure against exposure to or discussion of such materials, you should enroll in another course.

            Since much graded writing will be done during class, attendance is MANDATORY in order to receive the highest grade.  In addition, the in-class exercises provide practice for the major assignments you will be doing. It is your responsibility to be in class on time.  If you are absent, it is your responsibility to find out what has happened in class and what is due.  Absence is not an excuse for not having assignments or for not being aware of what is due or what is required. Do not ask me to re-teach a class which you miss.

            If you are late, you need to inform me after class that you came in.  Otherwise, you might not receive credit for your presence. You will not receive credit for your presence if you are more than 10 minutes late.  It is better to be late than to miss a complete class, but it is better not to be late.

 


 

Grading

 

Policies and Noticies:  If you make one of the mistakes listed in the Guide to College Writing as "mistakes NEVER to make," you may lose 10 points.  DON'T MAKE THESE MISTAKES! 

 

If you wish, you can revise and rewrite any paper (up to the last two weeks of the semester).  If the paper is acceptable (if you have made the corrections, followed the guidelines and suggestions for revision noted on the paper, and turned the paper in within one week), you will receive a 10% higher grade. 

 

You need to keep track of your grades and not ask "How am I doing?" or "What is my average?"  Do not expect to call and ask about a grade.  Grades will not be posted.  If you want your final grade earlier than it will be sent to you by the Registrar’s office, you can give me a stamped, self-addressed envelope and I will send it to you.

 

Grade Composition     

            Grades will be based on the following:


 

Graded material

In-class exercises                                  150 points

Journal                                                  200 points

Paragraph packet                                   100 points

Letter packet                                           50 points

Essay question answers                         100 points

50-minute essays          100 pts. each    200 points

Library assignment                                 100 points

Essays                         100 pts. each    200 points

Revision essay                                      100 points

Research project            50 pts/step        150 points

Grammar/Mode Final                              105 points

Portfolio                                                 300 points

           approximate TOTAL                     1755 points


 

Your scores

______________

______________

______________

______________

______________

______________

______________

______________

______________

______________

______________

______________

TOTAL  ______________


 

 

 


 

Papers will be graded on structure, grammar, spelling, punctuation, and logic as well as content.  Content cannot make up for technique, nor can technique make up for content.

 

Extra credit:  100 points maximum

1.  Attend a cultural event and write a critique (25 points possible for each one, 50 points maximum).

2.  Find a mistake in the Guide to College Writing (25 points each if you're the first to find the mistake).

3. Write a review on a film/television/video offering (25 pts. possible each, 50 points maximum).

 

Late Work

Assignments, other than in-class exercises, turned in late will lose 10% per day up to 30%. In-class exercises cannot be made up; if you are not in class to do the exercises, you will not receive the 10-point credit for that exercise.  No late work will be accepted more than two weeks after the initial submission date.

 

Closure Statement

The schedule and procedures in this course are subject to change in the event of extenuating circumstances.

 

Important Considerations

·         Essays and journal entries should be typed.  Other assignments should be typed or written on the front of loose-leaf notebook paper in ink.  (No spiral notebook paper or papers written in pencil will be accepted.)

·         All assignments should be properly assembled to hand in at the beginning of the class period in which they are due. Bring the assignments assembled and stapled, clearly labeled, completely ready to submit. Do not expect time to finish or to assemble or to staple assignments during class. Assignments turned in more than five minutes after the beginning of the class period are late.

·         I prefer that you not use ANY tobacco products in the classroom OR wear hats or caps.

·         Do not bring pagers or cell phones with audible notifications into the classroom. 

·         Failure to comply with these requests will be seen as denoting lack of respect for the class, the instructor, and your classmates.

 


 

COMPOSITION I

 JOURNAL ASSIGNMENTS

 

REQUIRED:

1.     Report on each essay in the Making Sense reader and on the other articles designated JA as we come to that assignment in the schedule.  Each report will contain three sections.

            Section 1:  Make a bibliographic entry, using MLA format. 

            Section 2:  Write one paragraph of summary. Paragraphs should be 7-13 sentences long.

            Section 3: In a separate paragraph, react to each article.  Evaluate the article's worth and/or effectiveness or tell how you feel about the article itself and/or about the subject of the article. Paragraphs should be 7-13 sentences long.

NOTE:  Journal entries should not be much more or less than one typed page each.

 

Grading:  Journals are worth 200 points. You will be submitting approximately 12 entries: each entry is worth  approximately 15 points. You will only receive half credit for any entries submitted late. This exercise is designed to raise your grade if you do the work.

 

Schedule and Text Assignments

 

NOTE:  Assignments are due the first day of class in the week in which they are listed. Assignments in Making Sense will be designated as MS; assignments in the Guide to College Writing will be designated GCW; assignments in The College Writer will be designated CW. The section on “Mechanics” from the Guide to College Writing (169-198) will apply to all assignments.

 

Week

Activity

Assignment

  1

Course introduction and syllabus

Diagnostic tests

Contract

GCW 1-10, 58-60, 61-68

start Fahrenheit 451

  2

Initial Essay

Review tests

How to write summaries and reports

Discuss The 39 Steps  assignment

CW 1-94 (skim and use for reference)

 GCW 69-86

MS 453 (Process: “The Embalming of Mr. Jones”). In the reaction/evaluation paragraph, discuss how the article fulfills the definition of a process essay.

  3

Library assignment

Library

Letters

Journals due:

“The Embalming of Mr. Jones”

MS 229 (Example: “Just Walk on By”)

MS 596 (Definition: “Being a Man”) In the reaction/ evaluation paragraph, discuss how the article fulfills the definition of an example/definition essay.

The 39 Steps  finished if you’re entering the contest.

GCW 147-156, 159-168

  4

Paragraphs

Writing Process

Unity/coherence/modes of development

Narration, Process, Example, Definition

 Due: Letter packet

          Library assignment

          Journals:

          “Just Walk on By”

                 “Being a Man”

 

MS 123-140, 375-388, 183-199, 513-530

MS 371 (Comparison: “Cross Talk”)

MS 522 (Analysis: “The No-Book Report”) In the reaction/ evaluation paragraph, discuss how the article fulfills the definition of a comparison/analysis essay.

GCW 21-60

 

  5

Paragraphs

Comparison, Analysis/cause-effect,

          Classification, Argument

Essay Question

Manuscript Preparation

Journals due:

“Cross Talk”

“The No-Book Report”

MS 311-327, 437-454,  239-257, 563-580

MS 301 (Classification: “The Dog Ate My Disc”) In the reaction/evaluation paragraph, discuss how the article fulfills the definition of a classification essay.

Fahrenheit 451  finished

  6

Writing Process

Essay structure

50-minute essay on Fahrenheit 451

Due:

      Paragraph Packet

     Journals:

        “The Dog Ate My Disc”

        Fahrenheit 451

MS 692 (Argument: “An Animal’s Place”) In the reaction/evaluation paragraph, discuss how the article fulfills the definition of an argumentative essay.

GCW 75-82

 

  7

Essay 1, using 50-minute Fahrenheit 451

Pre-writing

Planning

      Drafting

Journals due:

“Blundering into the Future”         

GCW 11-60

JA 8  (article from MS on topic of your choice)

  8

Essay 1

Peer evaluation

Editing

Journals due:

1 MS article

JA 9-10 (choose articles on a topic you have already have a journal entry on; use reputable periodicals; keep copies of the articles: The reaction paragraph on each one should discuss the relevance of the article to the other articles on the same topic.)

  9

Essay 1 due

Essay 2, documented Fahrenheit 451

Pre-writing

Planning

Drafting

Journals due:

2 articles

JA 11-12 (choose articles on a topic you have already have a journal entry on; use reputable periodicals; keep copies of the articles: The reaction paragraph on each one should discuss the relevance of the article to the other articles on the same topic.)

10

Essay 2

Peer evaluation

Editing

50-minute essay                  

MS choice extra credit

11

Essay 2 due

Documentation essay

Pre-writing

Planning

Drafting

Journals due:

12 articles/extra credit articles                 

MS choice extra credit

GCW   83-105

MS 653-665

12

Documentation essay

Peer evaluation

Editing   

Due: Documentation Essay (last class day)

 

 

13

Additional documentation

Essay questions

 

14

Additional Documentation Essays Due

Revision Essay

Revision Essay due (last class day of week)

 

15

In-Class Essay

Portfolio Evaluation Criteria

Portfolio Evaluation               

Portfolio due

16

Final (post-test)

*You must bring a ticket to the final.

 

 

Class Evaluation

 

Bring, as a ticket to the final, to the final a one-page, typed, no name attached, evaluation of the class. Tell what you liked and disliked about the class, what you think should be added, deleted, or changed. Make any suggestions you might have. Remember, if you don’t make suggestions, future students cannot benefit from your insight and experience. I will not see these evaluations until after the grades go to the Registrar’s office.


 

Portfolio

 

A writing portfolio is a collection of the products of your creative labor.  For this class, it has several purposes:

·         to show your best, revised writing;

·         to allow self- and teacher assessment of total progress;

·         to allow self- and teacher assessment of final outcome of the program;

·         to increase the number of people who can enjoy your work; to demonstrate the writing process; and

·         to demonstrate the recursive nature of creating text

 

The presentation of your portfolio (format, cover, etc.) should represent your personality and ability. Your portfolio must contain, clearly labeled,


 

1.  self-evaluation (see below for guidelines)

2.  one essay with writing process

3.  another writing product from this class

4.  a writing product from another class or from the community

5.  an artistic writing product (optional) or another writing project from this class

6.  initial essay

7.  final in-class essay


 

 

Self-evaluation:  Your self-evaluation is an important part of your portfolio and of your grade.  Answer the following questions as if you were answering an essay test question.  There is no “right” answer.  Honestly evaluate your strengths and weaknesses as a writer and assess your progress this semester.  (Guide:  about three pages total.)

1.       Which of the essays you wrote is your favorite?  Why?

2.       How did you improve as a writer this semester?  Be specific.

3.       Does this portfolio represent an accurate picture of you as a writer?  Why or why not?  How could it better represent your progress?

4.       Compare the initial essay and the final essay.  How did your writing change from the beginning of the semester to the end?  How does the initial essay reflect your skills and knowledge when you entered the class?  How does the final essay show the change in your writing?

5.       Why did you assign the points you did for the portfolio?

6.       Why did you select the manner of presentation you choose for the portfolio?

 

Assessment 

The portfolio is worth 300 points

You will be assigning a grade out of 100 points based on your assessment of your progress, your assessment of how well you did compared to other members of the class, your assessment of how you compare to what you know as “good writing.”

The committee will be assigning a grade out of 100 points, based on criteria agreed on by the class.

The instructor will assign a grade out of 100 points.  Specifically, the grade will reflect

·         whether all items are included, clearly labeled (10 points)

·         whether the self-evaluation is written in essay question answer format and adequately answer the question (20 points)

·         whether the final essay reveals a knowledge of essay structure and organization (50 points)

·         what you show you know about the writing process (10 points) and

·         how well you assess your skills and progress (10 points).

"

 

GRADING SHEET:

 


 

Your name  _____________________

Class  ________________________

 

Your assessment                       __________       of 100 points

Committee assessment              __________       of 100 points

Instructor assessment                __________       of 100 points


 

 


 

 

 

Name:

Date:

Class:

 

Documentation Exercise

 

Step 1: Choose a journal entry in which you are interested, either from a periodical or from the Making Sense Reader. You will be making another four journal entries on the same topic, for a total of five.

 

Step 2: Write an essay (400-600 words) on the topic that interests you, combining at least three sources and using an inclusive thesis statement. You will be writing an essay using the three sources; you will not report on the articles. You must come up with your own thesis statement. Check the following:

                        Write a complete academic essay.                                              ­­­­­­­­­_______________

                        Containing a thesis statement that takes a position.                     _______________

Use at least three sources.                                                         _______________

Use at least two paraphrase.                                                       _______________

Use at least two quotations.                                                        _______________

Document the quotation(s) and paraphrase(s) and any

summary, using MLA internal, parenthetical citation.         ________________

Include a Works Cited list as the last page of the assignment.       ________________

 

Step 3: Turn in the assignment.

Include the final draft on top, all drafts, plans, organization, pre-writing, and peer consultation and copies of all the sources, with the material you used highlighted. You do not need to include a copy of what you’ve used from Making Sense.

 

Step 4: When you receive the marked assignment, revise it and correct it.

 

Step 5: Using the essay you have constructed, change the documentation format to APA.

 

Step 6: Using the essay you have constructed, change the documentation format to MLA endnotes.

 

Step 7: Check the following:

            For MLA,

Have you included the original MLA format essay?                        _________________

Have you made sure you have the appropriate parenthetical

            citations?                                                                      _________________

Have you included a Works Cited page?                                      _________________

            For APA,

Have you changed the MLA format to APA?                                 _________________

Have you included an APA cover page?                                       _________________

Have you included an abstract:                                                    _________________

Have you included a Reference list to replace the Works Cited list? _______________

            For MLA end noted,

Have you changed the MLA parenthetical citation to endnotes?      _________________

Have you included a page of end notes?                                       _________________

Have you included a Works Cited list for the MLA endnotes?         _________________

 

Step 8:  Turn in the three essays and the original, marked draft, appropriately labeled.


 

Name:

Date:

Class:

 

Essay

TOPIC:  revision

Choose the essay which you enjoyed doing most.  Revise the essay: this means to re-VISION it.  Look at the topic again and change the essay substantially.  Make a new essay from this original topic.

Use the final copy of the original essay for the draft. Turn in the original and the new revised essay. Your grade will be based on the completeness of the revision.


 

 

Name:

Class:

Date:

Essay: Analysis Fahrenheit 451

300-1000 words


 

Turn the grade sheet in on top

then this sheet,

                        final draft,

                        organization page

 

draft(s)

pre-writing

                        peer consultation sheet


 

 

 

Name:

 

 

 


 

Class:

Date:

Essay

Comparison/Classification/Definition/Argument/Example/Analysis

TOPIC:  attitudes

            mistakes (value and/or tragedy)

300-1000 words


 

Turn the grade sheet in on top

then this sheet,

                        final draft,

                        organization page

 

draft(s)

pre-writing

                        peer consultation sheet


 

 

 

Name:

Date:

Class:

Essay

Comparison/Classification/Definition/Argument/Example/Analysis

TOPIC:  your choice

300-1000 words


 

Turn the grade sheet in on top

then this sheet,

                        final draft,

                        organization page

 

draft(s)

pre-writing

                        peer consultation sheet


 

 

 

Name:

Date:

Class:

 

Letter Packet

 

Write the following:

business letter of application to a company for a job for which you think you might be able to qualify

resume, using information applicable to right now

business envelope

Fold the letter and resume and put them in the envelope.
Name:

Date:

Class:

 

Paragraph Packet

 

Attach this sheet to the front of the paragraph packet.

Include each of the paragraphs, labeled with the topic of the paragraph

Use correct MLA manuscript preparation.

With each 75-150 word paragraph include, first, the final draft,

then organization

draft(s)

pre-writing

peer consultation sheet

 

Narrative

            Topic: any event from your life

 

 

Process paragraph

            TOPIC: Tell how to do something you know how to do well

            The audience to whom you are writing: _____________


 

 

                       


 

 

Example paragraph

            TOPIC: the best television shows ever made

the expectations people have of you

positive OR negative experiences you have had in high school education OR in becoming part of a group


 
 

 

 

Definition paragraph

            TOPIC: define, that is, tell what it means to have “style” OR “class” OR to be “average”


 

 

 

Comparison paragraph

            TOPIC: compare high school and college

compare one class you are taking now with another class of the same type from high school

compare one class you are taking now with another class which you are taking this semester


 
 

 

 

Analysis/cause and effect paragraph

TOPIC: why you are doing well/poorly in any one class

why you hold a belief you do (no religious beliefs please)


 
 

 

 

 

Classification paragraph

TOPIC: classify music to which you listen OR items for which you shop OR kinds of films you like


 

 

 

Argumentation/Persuasion

            Topic: any topic you feel strongly about except abortion, rock music, capital punishment, religion, AIDS

           
Name: ______________________

Class: _______________________

 

Library Assignment

 

Draw a map of the library on the back of this page. Include the following:


 

computers (label uses)

microfilm cabinets

microfilm readers

microfiche readers

microfiche cabinets

circulation desk

periodical section

reference section (not for check out)

videotape viewers

videotapes

books (to check out)section

reserved books

map cases

            any other pertinent items

           


 

 

 

 

 

Look up sources in the following categories on a subject in which you are interested and that is covered by one or more articles in the reader for the class. Write enough information to make bibliography entries for these sources.

 

Newspaper

Name of Paper:

Date:

Title or summary of article:

Pages:

 

Book

Name:

Author:

Date:

Publisher:

Place of publication:

 

Journal, magazine or other periodical

Name of periodical:

Author of article:

Date:

Title or summary of article:

Pages:

Volume/issue number:

 

Internet

Name of search engine:

Name of web page:

Author:

Date of posting:

Date of access:

Summary of web page contents:

Pages:

Volume/issue number:

URL:

 

 

 

 

 

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